Ways to Listen

Over-the-Air

Houston Public Media is broadcast over-the-air on 88.7FM, on both analog FM and HD Radio. If you own an HD Radio, tune it to 88.7FM and wait for the HD logo to light up. Once your radio is connected, you can listen to one of our three content streams:

  1. HD-1: A simulcast of Houston Public Media News 88.7's news and information programming
  2. HD-2: A simulcast of Houston Public Media Classical's classical music and arts programming
  3. HD-3: Houston Public Media Mixtape, which features contemporary alternative rock from XPoNential Radio, a service of WXPN in Seattle

Note: Our HD Radio signal doesn't reach as far as our analog signal. Our transmitter is located between Sugar Land and Pearland, just outside of Beltway 8, so orienting your antenna in that direction can help improve reception.

Listen Live Page

The easiest way to listen to all three of our streams on your computer is using the Listen Live page on this site. The Listen Live page has been tested on Microsoft Windows, Apple's macOS, and Linux, as well as iOS and Android.

We support most modern browsers. If you run into a problem, contact us and we will try to assist you.
Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Internet Explorer

Mobile App

Houston Public Media recently combined our HPM News and HPM Classical apps into our new unified Houston Public Media app! Now you can access all three of our streams – News, Classical, and Mixtape – as well as schedules and other content from the Houston Public Media website.

Get it on Google Play

Smart Speaker

Alexa

Amazon's Alexa service was initially available on their Echo line of smart speakers, but has since expanded to the Fire TV, Fire Tablet, and many other devices.

You can access our streams in several different ways:

Easiest to Use: NPR

  • To start, say "Alexa play NPR". You'll be prompted to name a station or search by location. We are available as "KUHF" or "Houston Public Media"
  • Once your station is set, to listen: say "Alexa play NPR"
  • Note: Only works for News stream

Most Flexible: HPM Streaming Skill

  • To enable, say "Alexa enable HPM Streaming"
  • To listen, say "Alexa ask HPM to play [stream name]"
    • Stream names are "News," "Classical," or "Mixtape"
  • You can also hear the current headlines by saying "Alexa ask HPM what is new"

Other Ways

  • Since our streams are available on TuneIn and iHeart, you can also ask Alexa to play our streams from there.
    • "Alexa, play Houston Public Media [stream name] on TuneIn"
      • News, Classical, and Mixtape are available
    • "Alexa, play Houston Public Media [stream name] on iHeart"
      • News and Classical are available

Flash Briefing

Alexa offers a Flash Briefing function that will deliver news and weather by saying "Alexa, give me my Flash Briefing" or "Alexa what is the news." You can customize what sources are featured in your Flash Briefing in the Alexa app, under Settings > Flash Briefing.

To include Houston Public Media in your Flash Briefing, say "Alexa, enable Houston Public Media Flash Briefing", or go to our entry in the Alexa Skill Store and click "Enable."

You can also add us from the Alexa App. Go to Settings and tap Flash Briefing. Tap the "Get More Flash Briefing Content" and do a search for "Houston Public Media".

Once enabled, you can set the order of your Flash Briefing sources and which sources are included within the Alexa app.

Google Assistant

Google Assistant is Google's latest version of its virtual assistant, which is available on the Google Home line of smart speakers, Android devices, and even iOS devices using the Google Assistant app.

To listen, say "Hey Google play Houston Public Media [stream name] on TuneIn"

  • Stream names are "News," "Classical," or "Mixtape"

Siri

Siri is Apple's virtual assistant that runs on most Apple devices, across macOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and HomePod.

Currently, the determining factor in how you can access our streams via Siri is whether or not you have an Apple Music subscription.

  • If you have an Apple Music subscription, you can play the HPM News stream by saying "Hey Siri play NPR News Houston News Eighty Eight Seven." This command works on iOS devices and on the HomePod.
  • If you do not have an Apple Music subscription, you currently won't be able to stream HPM News directly on the HomePod. However, you can use Airplay to send our stream to the HomePod from an iOS device. Also, on iOS devices, saying "Hey Siri play HPM News" will open our iOS app if you have it installed. HPM News is available in the iOS App Store.

Outside Services

Our streams can also be accessed through several outside streaming services.

Standalone Media Player

If the Listen Live page doesn't work for you, our streams are also accessible through standalone media players, such as Winamp, VLC, iTunes, etc.

We offer 2 formats for each of our streams: AAC and MP3. AAC offers higher quality audio while using less bandwidth than MP3, but MP3 is more widely compatible. We recommend trying the AAC version, and fall back to the MP3 if that doesn't work.

Troubleshooting

If you are experiencing intermittent interruptions in our streaming, there are a few things that you can check.

  • Check Your Wifi:
    If you live in an apartment or similar area and are connected to Wifi, you may need to check your router's configuration. Most modern Wifi routers broadcast in the 2.4GHz range by default. This provides a good mix of range and bandwidth, but within a densely populated area like an apartment building, this slice of electromagnetic spectrum can become saturated, which can greatly decrease the strength of your connection. Newer routers (Wifi 5+) can also broadcast in the 5GHz range, which may be helpful to use if available. The 5GHz signal doesn't provide as great of range as the 2.4GHz signal and can't penetrate walls or other objects as easily, but is usually less crowded.

    If you're on Wifi, try moving closer to your router and see if your connection improves. You may also try power cycling your router and modem. Simply unplug the power cable, count to 10, plug it back in, and wait for your devices to reconnect.

    If that still doesn't work, you may want to run a speed test to verify your connection speed. SpeedTest.net is a good option, or you can simply search for "speed test" in your search engine of choice. Audio streaming doesn't take a large amount of bandwidth (less than 1Mbps), but if your connection isn't able to sustain that, you may want to contact your ISP for help.

  • Check With Your IT Department:
    If you cannot access our streams at all, and are trying to connect to us using an office or corporate network, then your company's IT department may be blocking streaming altogether. In order to save bandwidth and ensure quality-of-service for their users, many companies block video and audio streaming on their networks. We don't necessarily enjoy that practice, but we certainly understand and apologize for any inconvenience.

  • Check Your Data Plan:
    Most wireless providers have so-called "unlimited data" plans, but there is a catch: while you do have access to unlimited amounts of data, the speed at which you access it can vary.

    It boils down to prioritization. If you use enough data to pass a predetermined threshold, your traffic will be given a lower priority. If you're in a sparsely populated area, you most likely won't notice. However, if you're in a densely populated area with a busier network, your connection speed may be lowered in favor of other customers. If your connection is given lower priority, it will most likely not be able to stream our station without interruptions or dropouts.

    The "deprioritization threshold" varies from carrier to carrier. For example, AT&T and Verizon's entry-level "unlimited" plans are always lower priority, while their more expensive plans have higher thresholds (AT&T's start at 15GB, Verizon's at 22GB). T-Mobile/Sprint allows you to use up to 50GB before being deprioritized.

If none of these options work for you, contact us and we will help.