Elections

Harris County leaders dismantle Elections Administrator’s Office

Posted on · Under Senate Bill 1750, the county clerk will take over management of elections, while the county tax assessor-collector will take charge of maintaining the county’s voter rolls.

Elections

Texas Supreme Court says Harris County must abolish its elections administrator’s office by September 1

Posted on · The state’s top civil court will still hear a challenge to Senate Bill 1750 on November 28. But Harris County Attorney Christian Menefee said that, once dismantled, the elections administrator’s office isn’t likely to be restored.

Elections

Judge temporarily blocks law abolishing Harris County elections administrator’s office; Texas AG files appeal

Posted on · Senate Bill 1750 was set to take effect September 1. It would require the county to get rid of its appointed elections administrator and shift the office’s functions back to the elected county clerk and county tax assessor-collector.

Politics

Texas House and Senate reach deal on $18 billion property tax cut package

Posted on · The agreement, which could pass the Legislature by the end of the week, includes a $100,000 homestead exemption and a pilot project to limit appraisal growth to 20% on non-homesteaded properties worth $5 million or less.

Elections

Elections bills, including two targeting Harris County, set to become law

Posted on · Among the bills lawmakers passed during the regular session are a measure that will abolish the Harris County Elections Administrator’s Office and another that will allow the Texas Secretary of State to impose “administrative oversight” of the county’s elections.

Politics

Two Texas bills could cost Harris County Elections Administrator Clifford Tatum his job

Posted on · Senate Bill 823 would give the secretary of state the power to replace an appointed elections administrator, while SB 1750 would abolish the office of elections administrator in Harris County, handing its duties back to a pair of elected officials.

Politics

Dueling property tax cut packages would reduce Texans’ tax bills by more than $16 billion

Posted on · There’s broad, bipartisan support in the Texas Legislature for using the state’s record surplus to cut taxes, but the Senate and House are at odds on how to accomplish that goal.

Politics

GOP-authored bills would increase penalties for illegal voting and limit Harris County’s control over elections

Posted on · Senate Bill 2 would make illegal voting a felony again. Other Republican-authored bills, filed in response to the 2022 Harris County general election, could cost Elections Administrator Clifford Tatum his job.

Politics

Senate Republicans aim to cut property taxes by a combined $16.5 billion, more than half the state’s surplus

Posted on · Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick and Senator Paul Bettencourt signaled potential friction with the House over the lower chamber’s proposal to use an appraisal cap to hold down property tax growth.

Politics

Bettencourt, Cain, and Schofield seek to abolish Harris County Election Administrator’s Office

Posted on · State Senator Paul Bettencourt and State Representatives Briscoe Cain and Mike Schofield have filed identical bills that would force counties with more than 1 million residents to eliminate the appointed office, handing its functions over to elected officials.

Politics

A bill making illegal voting a felony, again, advances in the Texas Senate

Posted on · Senate Bill 2 would make illegal voting an offense punishable by 2 to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. It’s one of several election-related bills before the Texas Legislature, several of which appear squarely aimed at Harris County.

Property Taxes

Politics

What a $50 savings per taxpayer is costing Harris County residents

Posted on · Republican officials contend last fall’s boycott of Harris County Commissioners Court was more than worth it, forcing cuts to what they saw as a bloated budget and granting relief to taxpayers burdened by inflation. But the bill is coming due in the form of starved departments and fewer services.