Houston Matters

‘Texas Blood’ Explores History Of The Borderlands Through One Ranching Family

Posted on · In his book, Texas Blood, journalist Roger D. Hodge explores the history of the Texas borderlands through the lens of seven generations of his own ranching ancestry and illuminates the brutal history of colonization, conquest, and genocide that dominated the West for centuries.

Houston Matters

How the Great Migration of African Americans Shaped Houston

Posted on · (Above: One of many University of Houston student projects related to The Great Migration of African Americans from the South to large cities during the 20th century. Photo Courtesy: University of Houston/Flickr) Students from the University of Houston and Texas Southern University recently collaborated to produce an exhibit on the Great Migration — the historical mass migration […]

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Top Workplaces in Houston, and Shutting Down Notorious Apartments: Tuesday’s Show (May 23, 2017)

Posted on · Every year, the Houston Chronicle puts together a list of the best workplaces in Houston, based on employee surveys distributed through a third-party company. The 2017 results won’t come until the fall, but, until then, what does make for a good workplace according to Houstonians? Is it the hours, the work space, the benefits, the […]

Houston Matters

How the Zapruder Film Changed One Family — and the Nation

Posted on · The idea of citizen journalism is fairly familiar these days. We’re used to seeing video footage on the news shot by someone with a smartphone. But one of the first, prominent such instances is the Zapruder film — 26 seconds of footage a bystander named Abraham Zapruder took of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy […]

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Understanding the Situation with North Korea, and Sandy Phan-Gillis Update: Tuesday’s Show (May 16, 2017)

Posted on · (Above: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is shown on a TV at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea on Sunday, May 14, 2017. Photo: Ahn Young-joon |AP) North Korea and the U.S. have been antagonistic since the 1950s and the Korean War — and it’s never really seemed to cool down in the past […]