Houston Matters

Full Show: Putting Faces On Skulls From San Jacinto, And Explaining Texas To Outsiders (April 30, 2018)

Posted on · On Monday's Houston Matters: Parents and advocates are calling on HISD to sue the state. Plus: A forensic artist brings to life the faces of soldiers lost at San Jacinto. Lawrence Wright talks about his book, God Save Texas. And Jeff Balke updates us on Houston sports.

Houston Matters

Misconceptions About Those Who Fought the Texas Revolution — and Why They Did

Posted on · (Above: The San Jacinto Monument. Photo: Michael Hagerty | Houston Public Media) On this day (April 21) in 1836, Texas forces won the Battle of San Jacinto, concluding the Texas Revolution. To mark the day, we listen back to a conversation Craig Cohen conducted on Feb. 24, 2016 about the people who prompted the revolution, […]

Houston Matters

Battle Reenactment Highlights the San Jacinto Festival

Posted on · (Above: The Battle of San Jacinto as depicted in an 1895 painting by Henry Arthur McArdle. Photo: Wikipedia Commons)The Battle of San Jacinto, fought on April 21, 1836, was the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. Led by General Sam Houston, the Texian Army fought and defeated General Antonio López de Santa Anna’s Mexican army in a […]

Full Show

Rep. Ted Poe, and Venezuelan Corruption Comes to Houston: Friday’s Show (April 21, 2017)

Posted on · Congressman Ted Poe has had an eventful spring so far. The Republican representing the Second Congressional District of Texas, which covers many eastern and northern suburbs of Houston, announced his decision to leave the House Freedom Caucus after that group of more conservative representatives wouldn’t budge on a proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act. Rep. Poe […]

Houston Matters

Murals on Storage Tanks Depict Images of Texas Independence

Posted on · We learn about two large murals on the sides of Shell storage tanks near Beltway 8 along Hwy 225. The murals depict scenes from the Battle of San Jacinto. Each mural measures forty feet by 140 feet. The artwork was created by Native Sun Productions, a media company based in San Antonio and Valparaiso, Ind.