Town Square

How History May View Donald J. Trump

Donald Trump leaves the presidency after one term and on the day 400,000 deaths due to COVID-19 were reported.

  • The press riser across from the White House is lit up, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021, in Washington. On President Trump's last day in office, there was an eerie quiet, with no public events scheduled, his last event being Jan. 12, seven days earlier.  (Photo Credit: Gerald Herbert/AP Photo)
    The press riser across from the White House is lit up, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021, in Washington. On President Trump's last day in office, there was an eerie quiet, with no public events scheduled, his last event being Jan. 12, seven days earlier. (Photo Credit: Gerald Herbert/AP Photo)
  • FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump arrives to address the nation from the White House on the ballistic missile strike that Iran launched against Iraqi air bases housing U.S. troops in Washington. The public won’t see President Donald Trump’s White House records for years, but there’s growing concern that they won’t be complete, leaving a hole in the history of one of America’s most tumultuous presidencies. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)
    FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump arrives to address the nation from the White House on the ballistic missile strike that Iran launched against Iraqi air bases housing U.S. troops in Washington. The public won’t see President Donald Trump’s White House records for years, but there’s growing concern that they won’t be complete, leaving a hole in the history of one of America’s most tumultuous presidencies. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)
  • FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo people listen as President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Washington. Historians say Trump’s legacy and his electoral undoing will be largely shaped by rhetoric aimed at stirring his largely white base that tugged at the long-frayed strands of race relations in America. ( (Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/AP Photo)
    FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo people listen as President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Washington. Historians say Trump’s legacy and his electoral undoing will be largely shaped by rhetoric aimed at stirring his largely white base that tugged at the long-frayed strands of race relations in America. ( (Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/AP Photo)
  • Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
    Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 15, 2019 file photo, Roger Stone exits federal court Washington. President Donald Trump on Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020 issued pardons and sentence commutations for 29 people, including former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Charles Kushner, the father of his son-in-law, in the latest burst of clemency in his final weeks at the White House. Also receiving a pardon is Roger Stone, another longtime Trump associate caught up in the probe of Russia and the Trump campaign.  (Photo Credit: Julio Cortez/AP Photo)
    FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 15, 2019 file photo, Roger Stone exits federal court Washington. President Donald Trump on Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020 issued pardons and sentence commutations for 29 people, including former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Charles Kushner, the father of his son-in-law, in the latest burst of clemency in his final weeks at the White House. Also receiving a pardon is Roger Stone, another longtime Trump associate caught up in the probe of Russia and the Trump campaign. (Photo Credit: Julio Cortez/AP Photo)
  • President Donald Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md. Trump announced he tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 2, 2020 (Photo Credit: (AP Photo/Alex Brandon))
    President Donald Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md. Trump announced he tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 2, 2020 (Photo Credit: (AP Photo/Alex Brandon))
  • The "Trump Tweet Truck" displays a tweet of then presidential candidate Donald Trump criticizing Republican Senator Ted Cruz during the 2016 campaign. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Antonio Arellano)
    The "Trump Tweet Truck" displays a tweet of then presidential candidate Donald Trump criticizing Republican Senator Ted Cruz during the 2016 campaign. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Antonio Arellano)
  • President Trump signs the CARES act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office of the White House on Friday. (Photo Credit: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images)
    President Trump signs the CARES act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office of the White House on Friday. (Photo Credit: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images)
  • FILE - In this Nov. 4, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump speaks to an election night party in the East Room of the White House in Washington. In Trump's presidency, fact checking became a cottage industry unto itself. And “alternative facts" became a buzzphrase, coined by one of his admiring aides. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
    FILE - In this Nov. 4, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump speaks to an election night party in the East Room of the White House in Washington. In Trump's presidency, fact checking became a cottage industry unto itself. And “alternative facts" became a buzzphrase, coined by one of his admiring aides. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
  • Donald Trump waits to step onto the portico for his presidential inauguration on Jan. 20.
    Donald Trump waits to step onto the portico for his presidential inauguration on Jan. 20.

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Town Square with Ernie Manouse airs at 3 p.m. CT. Tune in on 88.7FM, listen online or subscribe to the podcast. Join the discussion at 888-486-9677, questions@townsquaretalk.org or @townsquaretalk.

Timothy Naftali, clinical associate professor of public service at New York University and presidential historian, discusses how history may view Donald Trump’s divisive character as the defying feature of his presidency, rather than his policy.

Then, Rocky Rhodes, Constitutional law professor, South Texas College of Law answers your questions regarding the pardons Trump is expected to carry out in his last hours in office.

Town Square with Ernie Manouse is a gathering space for the community to come together and discuss the day's most important and pressing issues.

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