Houston Matters

The Highs and Lows of Overseeing Flood Control in Harris County

The executive director of the Harris County Flood Control District retires Wednesday (Aug. 31, 2016). Mike Talbott spent 35 years with the agency. As a young staff engineer, he witnessed the destruction of Hurricane Alicia in 1983. He worked his way up as the agency adopted computer modeling, digital mapping and new drainage rules for […]

From left to right: Mark Curran, assistant chief of the Houston Police Department, Mike Talbott, executive director of the Harris County Flood Control District, and Houston Council Member At-Large Michael Kubosh. (Photo: Al Ortiz, Houston Public Media)The executive director of the Harris County Flood Control District retires Wednesday (Aug. 31, 2016).

Mike Talbott spent 35 years with the agency. As a young staff engineer, he witnessed the destruction of Hurricane Alicia in 1983. He worked his way up as the agency adopted computer modeling, digital mapping and new drainage rules for private developers. Talbott sat down with Houston Matters producer Maggie Martin to talk about his accomplishments and what still needs to be done.

"We've got 22 watersheds in Harris County," Talbott said. "Each of them has their own independent flooding problems."

Talbott will be succeeded by the director of operations, Russ Poppe.

(Above: From left to right: Mark Curran, assistant chief of the Houston Police Department, Mike Talbott, executive director of the Harris County Flood Control District, and Houston Council Member At-Large Michael Kubosh. Photo: Al Ortiz, Houston Public Media)

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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