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More Houstonian Pet Peeves: Friday’s Show (December 11, 2015)

Every few months, we give you the opportunity to vent. It could be something about Houston, like the traffic or the weather. It could be something about your life. It could be something you just wished was a little bit different. It’s your pet peeve, that one thing that sticks in your craw, that you […]

Every few months, we give you the opportunity to vent. It could be something about Houston, like the traffic or the weather. It could be something about your life. It could be something you just wished was a little bit different. It’s your pet peeve, that one thing that sticks in your craw, that you just have to vent about, that makes your life in Houston just a little bit less than it could be. Oh, if ONLY!

Well, today is another one of those days! Share with the rest of Greater Houston that one thing about your life here that you wish you could change. That one thing that just raises your blood pressure a little, or takes some wind out of your sails. C’mon. Don’t bottle it up. Channel your inner Grampa Simpson, and let it out. (E-mail your Houstonian pet peeves now at talk@houstonmatters.org).

Joining us for this quarterly moan session: Ernie Manouse, Amber Ambrose, and Craig Hlavaty.

Also this hour: A lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to a rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of it all.

Today, Tamara Tabo, Ty Mahany and Mustafa Tameez discuss: scientists asking politicians to stop telling them how to do their jobs, calls to connect a potential high-speed rail line to downtown, and a Houston company giving $100,000 bonuses to its employees.

Plus: First published in 1857 in Galveston, the biennial Texas Almanac offers page after page about the history of the state, economic data, arts and culture…even the records of high school sports teams. But is it still necessary in an age when such information is just a Google search away? Houston Matters’ Michael Hagerty asks 2016 – 2017 edition (now published by the Texas State Historical Association) editor Elizabeth Alvarez.

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