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Littering, Human Rights First, and Mickey Gilley: Houston Matters for Wednesday, June 25, 2014

If you’re relatively new to Texas, you may not be aware that the phrase “Don’t Mess with Texas” was originally a slogan used in ad campaigns in the 1980s to reduce littering on Texas roads. And it worked. In the late ’80s, there was a significant, noticeable decrease in trash on Texas highways. But as […]

If you’re relatively new to Texas, you may not be aware that the phrase “Don’t Mess with Texas” was originally a slogan used in ad campaigns in the 1980s to reduce littering on Texas roads. And it worked. In the late ’80s, there was a significant, noticeable decrease in trash on Texas highways.

But as with all good slogans, “Don’t Mess with Texas” was co-opted, and became more of a statement about Texas swagger than about litter.

Perhaps it’s time for a new slogan. Drive down most any Houston highway or byway, and you’ll come across litter from cigarette butts flicked out the window, to cans, bags, wrappers – you name it. It’s an ongoing issue that has been on the minds of civic leaders from all over the Lone Star state, attending the 47th annual Keep Texas Beautiful Conference in Austin. The conference wraps up today.

On this edition of Houston Matters, we discuss community beautification, waste reduction and litter prevention efforts around the Lone Star State.

Also this hour: We talk with the CEO of Human Rights First, an organization which links asylum-seekers with attorneys. We find out why Human Rights First is opening an office here in Houston.

Plus: A conversation with classic country star Mickey Gilley. His famous Pasadena honky-tonk bar Gilley’s was a must-stop venue for his fellow country music stars in the 1970s and served as the backdrop for the 1980 John Travolta film Urban Cowboy, shot in Pasadena and Houston.

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