Weather

Hanna Drenches Deep South Texas

The cyclone made two landfalls Saturday evening and spent the weekend tormenting the region with damaging winds, torrential rains and widespread flooding.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. Sunday

A South Texas region exhausted by a months-long struggle with COVID-19, drought and economic distress now marshaled its resources to endure one more massive challenge: Hanna, the first Atlantic hurricane of 2020. The cyclone made two landfalls Saturday evening and spent the weekend tormenting the region with damaging winds, torrential rains and widespread flooding.

More than 155,000 people were out of power in South Texas Sunday morning as Hurricane Hanna moved inland overnight and weakened back into a Tropical Storm. The National Hurricane Center, or NHC, reported Sunday morning that although Hanna is now a Tropical Storm, heavy rainfall, strong winds, flash flooding, and tornadoes remain a threat.

The NHC reported Saturday that Hanna’s centerpoint, or its eye, made a first landfall around 5 p.m. north of Port Mansfield once it reached Padre Island.

Aircraft sent into the storm measured maximum sustained winds of 90 mph. A weather station at Rincon del San Juan measured at least one gust of 74 mph.

At 6:15 p.m., Hanna made a second landfall in eastern Kenedy County once the eye reached mainland Texas.

Hanna’s sustained wind strength placed it in the lowest of five hurricane categories, as defined by the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The storm continued along its forecasted track as it moved farther inland over southern Texas into northeastern Mexico on Sunday.

 

The Coastal Bend

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