Transportation

Houston Midtown Greyhound bus station to end service Thursday, property still listed for sale

Residential high rises, mid-rise multifamily homes, restaurants, and bars surround the soon-to-be vacant bus stop building in midtown, which quickly became high real estate in a rapidly growing central Houston neighborhood.

Greyhound Bus Station has been listed for sale, and some experts believe it could help redevelopment in the area.
Patricia Ortiz / Houston Public Media
Greyhound Bus Station has been listed for sale, and some experts believe it could help redevelopment in the area.

Operations of the longtime Greyhound bus station servicing downtown Houston will relocate to a new southeast location on Thursday.

The new location is about six miles away from the former station that was conveniently located in Midtown, blocks away from downtown Houston. It has already been operating Greyhound and Autobus Americanos services. In a transportation hub east of downtown, the new location at 7000 Harrisburg Blvd. is located directly adjacent to the Magnolia Park Transit Center, marked as the end of Metro’s Green Line light rail.

The move comes after the 30,000 square foot property went up for sale in January. A lease held by Greyhound is set to expire in October next year.

Residential high rises, mid-rise multifamily homes, restaurants, and bars surround the soon-to-be vacant bus stop building in midtown, which quickly became high real estate in a rapidly growing central Houston neighborhood. But a stunted development environment has been attributed to the areas major spike in crime.

Houston Police Department Commander Caroleta Johnson said the department is trying to continuously keep one or two officers in the area.

The bus station was once used as a Texas Department of Corrections drop off location for inmates, but Johnson said former inmates are not the real target contributing to the crime uptick in the area. She told Houston Public Media in Sept. that part of the motivation for reducing criminal activity around that station was to “reduce their vulnerability to being sucked back into a lifestyle they had prior to them going to prison.”

The property, built in 1979, is currently valued at more than $7 million, and is still listed for sale on LoopNet, an online marketplace for commercial real estate.

It was time for the dilapidated, old Greyhound bus station to move, Jeff Peden, an executive managing director for Transwestern, said earlier this year.

“Whatever that time period is, I think that McDonald's closing, I think that Greyhound closing, and hopefully construction being underway for the rerouting of I-45, if all that occurs, I think it could be a great lift for the entire area,” he said.