Houston Matters

Study Examines How and Where ‘Near-Misses’ Happen on Houston Roads

(Above: An illustration of some common “near-misses” Houston cyclists and pedestrians face on Houston roads. Images Courtesy: Kinder Institute for Urban Research.) We’ve all had near-misses on Houston roads – moments where we just dodged an accident. It could be a host of things, from changing lanes and not realizing there was someone in your […]

Near Misses Banner(Above: An illustration of some common “near-misses” Houston cyclists and pedestrians face on Houston roads. Images Courtesy: Kinder Institute for Urban Research.)

We’ve all had near-misses on Houston roads – moments where we just dodged an accident. It could be a host of things, from changing lanes and not realizing there was someone in your blind spot to a speeding car not seeing you when you’re riding your bike.

It’s the latter type of experience – and ones like it – that a team of researchers studied more closely in recent months.

Dian Nostikasari and Kyle Shelton of Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research have published their findings in a new report called Learning from Close Calls: A Glimpse Into Near-Miss Experiences.

Joshua Zinn has more on what they found – and what exactly they mean by a “near-miss.”

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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