Texas Elections 2018

UPDATE: Lupe Valdez Wins Democratic Runoff And Will Be Candidate For Texas Governor

In the race to be the GOP candidate for District 2 of the U.S. House, former Navy Seal and political newcomer Dan Crenshaw beats Texas State Representative Kevin Roberts

On May 22, 2018, former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez won the Democratic runoff election and became the first openly gay and first Latina nominated for Governor of Texas.

THE LATEST on primary runoff elections in Texas

Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez won Tuesday the Democratic runoff election to become the candidate who will run against Texas Governor Greg Abbott on November 6. Valdez was running against Houston businessman Andrew White.

Valdez is Texas’ first openly gay and first Latina governor nominee.

Valdez initially celebrated the victory on her campaign’s Twitter feed.

Gilberto Hinojosa, chair of the Texas Democratic Party, issued a statement congratulating Valdez. “Over 350,000 Texas Democrats made their voices heard, the best Democratic runoff turnout in recent history. Lupe prevailed but we congratulate Andrew White on a hard-fought race. Andrew and Lupe battled fiercely but it’s because both of them care deeply about the future of Texas,” Hinojosa noted in his statement.

White congratulated Valdez through his campaign’s Twitter feed.

White also said in a statement: “I’m proud of what we accomplished in the last six months, and I’m going to fight for Beto, Lupe and all the great Democratic candidates. We’ve got to win in November. Texas is counting on us.”

Aside from the Valdez-White race, another one that was relevant was between former Navy Seal and political newcomer Dan Crenshaw and Texas State Representative Kevin Roberts. They were competing to be the GOP candidate in November for Texas’ District 2 in the U.S. House of Representatives and Crenshaw won.

Crenshaw will face attorney Todd Litton, who won the five-way Democratic primary in March.

District 2, which encompasses many of Houston’s suburban Republican strongholds, is represented by veteran Republican Congressman Ted Poe, who will retire from Congress.

On the Democratic side, there were several races for the U.S. House. One of the most notable was the one between Lizzie Pannill Fletcher and Laura Moser.

Panill Fletcher and Moser were competing to be the Democratic candidate for Texas’ District 7 and, at 10:21 p.m. and with 81 percent of the precincts reported, Pannill Fletcher had won the race with 67.9 percent of the votes.

Click here for comprehensive coverage of the 2018 Texas runoff election.

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In the March 6 primary election, Valdez beat Andrew White by almost 15 percentage points. The former Dallas County Sheriff won 42.9 percent of the votes, while the Houston businessman got 27.4 percent of the votes.

As reflected in a debate that took place earlier this month, White –who is the son of the late Texas Governor Mark White— has presented himself to the electorate as the more moderate candidate, while Valdez has said that a middle of the road attitude wouldn’t work because Democrats are “angry” due to the way President Donald Trump is doing his job.

Abortion and immigration have been two of the most relevant topics during the campaign.

White personally opposes abortion, but had stressed his personal beliefs wouldn’t impact his job as Governor and has noted he would veto any legislation that intended to infringe on the right of a woman to have an abortion.

Valdez has commented that White’s personal opposition to abortion implies that women who decide to have one don’t respect life and, after the debate, said she would be more proactive than White in working to protect abortion rights in Texas.

On immigration, Valdez has been criticized for the way in which, as Sheriff of Dallas County, didn’t go all the way in refusing to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), as Sheriff Sally Hernandez, her counterpart in Travis County, did.

On his campaign website, White asserts he believes in “a secure border” and also in “effective policies for legal immigration,” while adding that there is “a way to be rigorous and compassionate.”

On her campaign website, Valdez says that standing up for immigrant communities has been a “staple” of her life and adds she supports protecting ‘Dreamers’ and enacting a “comprehensive immigration reform” with a pathway to citizenship.

The economy, along with education and the reform of the criminal justice system, are additional issues that White and Valdez have touched on during their respective campaigns.

Races in Harris County

The only statewide race is the one between Valdez and White.

As for races in Harris County, there are two for Republican seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.

One is between Dan Crenshaw and Kevin Roberts, who are competing to be the Republican candidate for District 2 in November. The other is between Phillip Aronoff and Carmen Maria Montiel, who are competing to be the Republican candidate for District 29, which is a Latino majority district that, up until now, has been represented by the seasoned Democratic Congressman Gene Green, who is retiring.

The winner of the race between Aronoff and Montiel will face Texas State Senator Sylvia Garcia, another veteran Democratic politician, in November

The other two races in Harris County’s Republican ballot are for the position of Judge in the 295th Judicial District –with Michelle Fraga and Richard Risinger are competing in that race— and for Justice of the Peace, Precinct 5 Place 2 –with Jeff Williams and Mike Wolfe competing—.

The Democratic ballot has more races than the Republican in Harris County.

There are three races for the U.S. House, specifically for districts 7, 10 and 22.

Lizzie Pannill Fletcher and Laura Moser are competing in the race to become the Democratic candidate for District 7 in November, while Tawana Walter-Cadien and Mike Siegel are competing to be the Democratic candidate for District 10.

Additionally, Sri Preston Kulkarni and Letitia Plummer are running to be the Democratic candidate for District 22 in November.

There are also two races for the Texas Legislature on the Democratic ballot in Harris County.

Fran Watson and Rita Lucido are running to be the Democratic candidate for District 17 of the Texas Senate, while Sandra G. Moore and Marty Schexnayder are competing to be the Democratic candidate for District 133 of the Texas House of Representatives.

Also at the county level, Marilyn Burgess and Roslyn ‘Rozzy’ Shorter are running to be the Democratic candidate for District Clerk, while Gayle Young Mitchell and Diane Trautman are competing to be the Democratic candidate for the position of County Clerk.

Cosme Garcia and Dylan Osborne are running to be the Democratic candidate for County Treasurer.

The Harris County Democratic ballot also includes two races for school trustees. Josh Wallenstein and Richard Cantu are running to be the Democratic candidate in November for Position 3 At Large, while Prince E. Bryant, II and Danyahel (Danny) Norris are competing to be the Democratic candidate for Position 6 Precinct 1.

Cheryl Elliott Thornton and Sharon M. Burney are competing to be the Democratic candidate in November for the position of Justice of the Peace, Precinct 7, Place 2.

The last race listed on Harris County’s Democratic ballot is the one between Lydia C. Balderas and Diane Olmos Guzman for the position of Chairman for Precinct 0027.

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Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz

Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz

General Assignment Reporter

Alvaro 'Al' Ortiz is originally from Spain. He worked for several years in his home country and gained experience in all varieties of journalism, from wire services to print, as well as broadcast news and digital reporting. In 2001, Al came to the United States to pursue a Master's degree...

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