Politics

Congressional gerrymandering by Texas Republicans cut out the heart of Houston’s Asian community

Asian and Pacific Islander populations surged in Texas over the past decade, but their political power is weakened under new congressional maps. A northwest Houston neighborhood offers a case study in how that was done.

Hyunja Norman at the Korean Community Center in Spring Branch.
An estimate of eligible voters by race and ethnicity is not available for voter tabulation districts or precincts. This map shows the voting age population.

More than symbolic

Fort Bend County's Asian neighborhoods now split between three congressional districts

Some Asian neighborhoods in Fort Bend County were moved to the 22nd Congressional District, which stretches for roughly 3,700 square miles and extends into rural Wharton and Matagorda counties. In CD-22, around half of eligible voters are white.

An estimate of eligible voters by race and ethnicity is not available for voter tabulation districts or precincts. This map shows the voting age population.

Asian populations are split up by the new CD-4

This new congressional district carves up the heavily Asian neighborhoods of Collin County and places them in a district that stretches north to the Oklahoma border, encompassing 12 other counties across roughly 5,400 square miles. White voters control elections in the district.

An estimate of eligible voters by race and ethnicity is not available for voter tabulation districts or precincts. This map shows the voting age population.

Not voting monoliths

Subscribe to Today in Houston

Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.

* required

Share