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Houston Matters Weekend for October 8, 2016

Recently, News 88.7’s Gail Delaughter noted how often she hears folks ask “why can’t Houston be more like” a city where they used to live, particularly when it comes to transportation and mass transit. We talk about such examples with Gail, as well as the city’s planning director Patrick Walsh, and Ryan Holeywell from the […]

Photo: Derek Stokely. Graphic: Michael Hagerty, Houston Public MediaRecently, News 88.7’s Gail Delaughter noted how often she hears folks ask “why can’t Houston be more like” a city where they used to live, particularly when it comes to transportation and mass transit.

We talk about such examples with Gail, as well as the city’s planning director Patrick Walsh, and Ryan Holeywell from the Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

We explore why, in some cases, Houston really can’t be like another city, and we welcome any examples you have of other cities that, in some way, you wish Houston would emulate.

Also this hour…

Online Voter Registration

Then, the Texas House Elections Committee recently considered bills to make Texas the 21st state to allow citizens to register to vote online. The committee left both bills pending after hearing criticism primarily from Harris County, including Tax Assessor-Collector Mike Sullivan, Ed Johnson from the County Clerk’s office and Alan Vera, who chairs the Ballot Security Committee of the Harris County GOP.

Houston Democrat Carol Alvarado sponsored one of the bills, HB 953, which she says would curb government waste. She maintains paper registration costs more and requires more manpower than online registration. Opponents argue the current system works fine as is. We hear highlights of Sullivan’s testimony before the committee (Sullivan declined our invitation to appear on this program), and then we talk with Rep. Alvarado. We also hear from Dr. Jon Taylor, chair and professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of St. Thomas.

Understanding Eating Disorders

Plus, you might recognize the symptoms of certain eating disorders. Anorexia was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, known as the DSM, in 1952. That made the illness more recognizable by doctors and eventually the general public. The same recognition of the disorder bulimia came later, in 1980.

Recently, a new disorder has made it into the DSM. It’s called orthorexia nervosa, and it refers to those who have an unhealthy obsession with eating healthy. We find out more about the disorder — and what it means for those who suffer from eating disorders — from Amanda Holben. She’s a registered dietitian with Fork in the Road Nutrition Counseling. She tells Houston Matters producer Paige Phelps about her practice and the new and old issues she sees.

Novel Looks at a Gilded Age in Houston  History

Finally, the 1950s could be defined as an era of prosperity in America. In River Oaks, it was even more so, as author Anton DiSclafani illustrates in her new book The After Party. She tells Maggie Martin how the Houston neighborhood made such an impression on her at a young age.

And she says more fiction authors should be writing about Houston, especially in the era of new moneyed oil barons like Glen McCarthy and his extravagant Shamrock Hotel because it’s a “perfect pressure cooker of wealth and power and this new world, really.”

Houston Matters Weekend airs every Saturday at 1 p.m. on News 88.7. If you have questions or comments about something you hear, e-mail us at talk@houstonmatters.org. | News 88.7 Program Lineup

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