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Bad Texan Confessions: Friday’s Show (November 20, 2015)

Do you have a secret that you feel makes you a bad Texan? Maybe you don’t like barbecue, or don’t really care for high school football. Well, it’s time to get it off your chest, as we encourage you to share your “bad Texan” confessions on this edition of Houston Matters. What’s a uniquely Texan […]

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Do you have a secret that you feel makes you a bad Texan? Maybe you don’t like barbecue, or don’t really care for high school football. Well, it’s time to get it off your chest, as we encourage you to share your “bad Texan” confessions on this edition of Houston Matters.

What’s a uniquely Texan thing that you just don’t do, don’t get, don’t care about, for which you feel it’s time to fess up? (Share your bad Texan confessions now at talk@houstonmatters.org).  We welcome your examples, and hear more confessions from Texas Monthly senior editor John Nova Lomax, and former area TV political and legal reporter Saundria Chase Gray.

Also this hour: A lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to our rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of it all. On today’s panel: Houston Chronicle writer and Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me panelist Kyrie O’Connor, Houston-based energy industry consultant and former host of the conservative talk show The Civil Right  Natalie Arceneaux, and  Claudia Kolker, intellectual capital editor at Rice Business School and author of the book The Immigrant Advantage. They discuss what’s good, bad, or ugly about Gov. Abbott joining many state officials across the nation taking steps to prevent Syrian refugees from being resettled in their respective states and the last of “The Woodlands Ten” making parole 24 years after the beating and stabbing death of Houston banker Paul Broussard.

Plus: A conversation with Dr. Michael Cottingham. He’s studied the benefits of adaptive sports for people with disabilities. Cottingham’s the director of the Adaptive Athletics Program at the University of Houston, and he tells Houston Matters’ Paige Phelps why he’s so passionate about adaptive sports and what they can do for athletes.

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