Houston Matters

How Immigration Reform will Affect Houston

The so-called “Gang of Eight” in Congress seems poised to announce their proposal for comprehensive immigration reform. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano was in Houston last week to discuss it. And rallies calling for such reform took place across the country on Wednesday, including here in Houston, where participants and onlookers alike shared strong opinions […]

The so-called "Gang of Eight" in Congress seems poised to announce their proposal for comprehensive immigration reform. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano was in Houston last week to discuss it. And rallies calling for such reform took place across the country on Wednesday, including here in Houston, where participants and onlookers alike shared strong opinions about the potential legislation and what it might mean for a path to citizenship for an estimated eleven million undocumented people including Christopher Schillaci from Southwest Houston, Ten-year-old Daniel Betencourt, and onlooker Amber Schackley from Katy.

While there seems to be momentum towards establishing comprehensive reform, what that means depends on who you talk to. Some oppose a path to citizenship; and prefer to focus on increasing border security. Some simply want to streamline current regulations in immigration policy.

This issue impacts so many people in and around Houston, which you may have heard referred to once or twice as the most diverse city in America. Joined by Martin Robles, a resident of Houston near Baytown who was undocumented but now, through the DREAM Act, has a work permit that allows him to remain here in the U-S. Aurora Losada is the editor of La Voz de Houston, or The Voice of Houston – a Spanish language bi-weekly paper distributed by the Houston Chronicle. Angelique Montano is an immigration attorney with the Houston-based law firm DeMott, McChesney, Curtright and Armendariz.

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