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Sleep and Sleep Disorders: Tuesday’s Show (July 12, 2016)

On the road, at work, at school and at home — we, our friends, neighbors, co-workers and loved ones average less than seven hours of sleep each weekday. That’s a lot of sleep-deprived Houstonians. And we’re not just tired. We’re inattentive, less productive and it’s not good for us. That’s why every six months or so, […]

The downtown Houston skyline as seen from the Pierce Elevated. Photo: Michael Hagerty, Houston Public MediaOn the road, at work, at school and at home — we, our friends, neighbors, co-workers and loved ones average less than seven hours of sleep each weekday. That’s a lot of sleep-deprived Houstonians. And we’re not just tired. We’re inattentive, less productive and it’s not good for us.

That’s why every six months or so, Houston Matters seeks to help the insomniacs, sleepwalkers, snorers and otherwise restless sleepers among us. On this edition of the program, we welcome your questions about sleep and sleep disorders for Dr. Richard Castriotta, Medical Director of Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center’s Sleep Disorders Center and director of pulmonary and sleep medicine at UT Health’s McGovern Medical School.

Also this hour:

Improving Transportation and Appearance Around Hobby Airport

The Houston-Galveston Area Council is leading a study to improve transportation options in the Hobby Airport area. The Houston-Galveston Area Council says the Livable Centers plan for Greater Hobby will identify short-term and long-term goals. The group is holding a workshop tomorrow (July 13, 2016), where area residents and businesses can give their input. We talk with H-GAC’s Meredith Dang about the plan. We also talk with Anne Culver from Scenic Houston and Tony Allender from the Hobby Area Management District about how they’ll oversee the implementation of proposed projects.

J.R. Richard Is Still Throwing Heat

Tonight (July 12, 2016) is Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game. The Houston Astros have two players representing them in this year’s midsummer classic: second-baseman Jose Altuve and relief pitcher Will Harris.

But more than 25 years ago, in 1980, one of the players that represented them in the All-Star Game was pitcher J.R. Richard. He was a mainstay in the Astros rotation throughout the 1970s, and one of the dominant pitchers of his era. But he saw it all vanish when he suffered a stroke at the age of 30.

The descent was sharp – filled with aborted comeback attempts, continued health challenges, divorce, depression, economic woes and – for a time – homelessness. But Richard’s story is also one of redemption. Faith and a new love helped him turn his life around. He talks about this rise, fall, and rise again in his memoir, Still Throwing Heat: Strikeouts, the Streets, and a Second Chance. We listen back to our conversation with Richard from last summer.

Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.

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