Houston Matters

What’s the Future of Energy in Greater Houston?

A generation ago, in the Houston of the 1980s, energy companies relied almost exclusively on the production and distribution of fossil fuels, and Houston relied almost exclusively on the oil and gas industry to drive the economy. The industry and the community’s fates were intertwined, for better or worse. Today Houston is more diversified, and […]

Energy journalists Russ Capper, Loren Steffy and Dave Fehling talk with host Craig Cohen.
Energy journalists Russ Capper, Loren Steffy and Dave Fehling talk with host Craig Cohen.

A generation ago, in the Houston of the 1980s, energy companies relied almost exclusively on the production and distribution of fossil fuels, and Houston relied almost exclusively on the oil and gas industry to drive the economy. The industry and the community’s fates were intertwined, for better or worse.

Today Houston is more diversified, and so is the energy industry here – but the slow transition to more renewable forms of energy comes in tandem with record natural gas production and supply in the last 12 months far outstripping demand. The price of crude oil is less than half of what it was just a year ago. What does that mean for the future of energy in Greater Houston, and in turn, for the businesses and residents of the Energy Corridor?

To discuss that, and other questions, we turn first tonight to three folks who watch and cover energy in Houston: Loren Steffy is a columnist for EnergyVoice.com, a writer-at-large for Texas Monthly and the Managing Director for 30 Point Strategies; Russ Capper is the founder and co-host of The BusinessMakers Show and The Energy Makers Show, and is one of the rotating panelists on Houston Matters’ The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly; and Dave Fehling covers energy and the environment for News 88.7.

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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