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Water Quality, Recording Laws, and The Men of Moores: Houston Matters for Tuesday, July 15, 2014

One weekend just a few weeks back, hundreds of Houston residents complained about the taste and smell of their tap water. The City of Houston said the odor and taste was a result of increased levels of naturally-occurring compounds in untreated surface water supplies. The Public Works Departments said, despite the unappealing taste and odor, […]

One weekend just a few weeks back, hundreds of Houston residents complained about the taste and smell of their tap water. The City of Houston said the odor and taste was a result of increased levels of naturally-occurring compounds in untreated surface water supplies. The Public Works Departments said, despite the unappealing taste and odor, the water was safe to drink.

Let’s face it – we take water for granted. We turn on the faucet and expect it. We look out the car window at the Bayou, or the Gulf, and we view it. We head to the beach, walk out to the water’s edge, and we wade into it.

Water is, of course, vital for our continued existence. Which makes maintaining water quality in Greater Houston a critical job.

On this edition of Houston Matters, we discuss efforts to maintain water quality, from what comes out of the tap to our natural waterways. We welcome your questions for Yvonne Forrest from the City of Houston’s Drinking Water Operations, and Todd Running, from the Houston-Galveston Area Council’s Water Resources Program.

Also this hour: A YouTube video was passed around recently showing a trucker “pulling over” a policeman for speeding and using his cell phone. The trucker recorded his interaction with the officer, which changed fairly radically once the officer realized he was being recorded. At the end of the video, the trucker, Brian Miner, says, “And that’s what happens when they know you’re recording.”

This sort of interaction can’t actually legally occur in every U.S. state. Some states require both parties to consent to such a recording. Here in Texas, we’re a “one party consent” state. To find out what that means, and the circumstances and manner under which you can and cannot record conversations in Texas, we talk with University of Houston Law Professor Peter Linzer.

And: The Men of Moores is an a capella choral ensemble made up of undergrads at the University of Houston’s Moores School of Music. The group sings its own arrangements of pop and contemporary tunes, and just recorded its first  single – a cover of Radiohead’s 1992 hit “Creep.”  Houston Public Media’s St. John Flynn sat down with two members of the group to learn more about the process of arranging pop songs for 14 voices – and no instruments.

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