Criminal Justice

UPDATE: At Least 43 Texans Face Charges In The Wake Of The U.S. Capitol Siege

Those charged include six Houston-area residents.

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington.

This is a developing story and will be updated as we learn new information. Details are gathered from federal court documents and research from the George Washington University Program on Extremism.

The Capitol Siege | The Arrested And Their Stories

Updated May 7 6:03 p.m. CT

A couple from Forestburg, Texas, along with the father of another insurrectionist, join the growing list of Texans facing federal charges after the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. At least 43 Texans have now been arrested.

Authorities say Mark and Jalise Middleton repeatedly assaulted Capitol police while at the front of a barricade located at the West Front of the Capitol building. Bodycam footage shows the married couple yelling expletives while striking at least two officers, according to court documents. One of the officers then deploys a chemical spray, forcing the couple to retreat.

Investigators say they identified the couple after receiving tips and reviewing the couple's Facebook accounts. The two had posted about their experiences at the Capitol several times, and Mark Middleton had even posted a video seemingly recorded on Capitol grounds.

"We are on the front lines. We helped push down the barriers," Mark allegedly said. "Make America great again! Freedom!"

The couple is now facing seven federal charges, including: assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, obstruction of justice/Congress, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds, engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Jason Owens of Blanco allegedly joined pro-Trump extremists and stormed the Capitol alongside his son, Grady Owens. Houston Public Media previously reported Grady Owens' arrest, after he allegedly assaulted a capitol police officer with a skateboard.

Investigators traced the father’s cell phone location during the time of the incident, which showed the device's location in and around the Capitol building, according to court documents.

Authorities say a witness identified the father/son duo, which prompted investigators to comb through bodycam footage to see if Owens assaulted police officers along with his son.

Bodycam footage allegedly shows Jason Owens shoving an officer moments after his son allegedly assaulted another officer with a skateboard, according to authorities.

Owens is now being charged with assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers or employees, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, knowingly committing an act of physical violence in any restricted building or grounds, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Updated April 30 2:31 p.m. CT

An Alpine resident, who previously garnered attention online after covering his home with conspiratorial messages, was arrested Wednesday for his alleged participation in the Jan 6. Capitol insurrection. That brings the total number of Texans charged in the attack to at least 40.

Authorities say Sean Watson entered the Capitol building alongside other pro-Trump extremists and captured photos and videos on his phone. Two witnesses told the FBI that Watson had shown his coworkers multiple videos from within the Capitol building.

Last year, Watson covered his home with messages and banners that read "COVID1984" and "Democrats stole the election." Photos of his home went viral on social media soon after. Watson, who initially denied being involved in the riot, admitted to his participation after authorities raided his home and seized his phone, according to the FBI.

Watson's phone contained photos and videos taken on Capitol grounds and within the Capitol building, as well as texts about his role in the incident, according to the sworn affidavit.

"I was one of the people that helped storm the capitol building and smash out windows," one of Watson's texts read. "We made history today. Proudest day of my life!"

Watson is now being charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, violent entry, and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds.

Updated April 23 10:27 a.m. CT

An employee of InfoWars based in San Marcos, Texas was arrested last week after allegedly entering the Capitol building alongside other pro-Trump extremists during the Jan 6. insurrection, bringing the total number of Texans charged in the attack to at least 39.

Authorities say Samuel Montoya recorded his experience inside the Capitol building, and even filmed the moment 35-year-old Air Force veteran Ashli Babbitt was fatally shot by police.

In a 44-minute long video titled "Patriots Storm Congress Raw Footage Includes Execution of Ashli Babbitt," Montoya can be seen outside and inside the building, with the video ending shortly after Babbitt was shot according to the sworn affidavit.

"I don't wanna get shot, I'll be honest, but I don't wanna lose my country. And that's more important to me than—than getting shot," he allegedly said as he made his way into the Capitol building, according to court documents.

Investigators say Montoya can be heard throughout the video calling himself a "reporter" or "journalist" as he attempted to get through crowds. The director of the Congressional press galleries confirmed that no one matching Montoya's name had Congressional press credentials at the time of the attack, according to court documents.

The FBI received a tip from a family member of Montoya, who told investigators that Montoya had shown relatives several videos that he shot during the attack.

After the attack, investigators say Montoya appeared on an InfoWars show titled "War Room with Owen Shroyer," where Montoya is credited as an InfoWars video editor. During the interviews, Montoya spoke about his experience inside the Capitol building, described observations made about possible "agitators," and his recollections of the scene of Babbitt's shooting, according to court documents.

"While there (was) a lot of Trump supporters in there, there was definitely activity with agitators going on that we need to investigate and it's part of this whole conversation to explain what really happened," Montoya said during one of the interviews.

Montoya is now charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building, disorderly and disruptive conduct in a capitol building, impeding passage through the capitol grounds or buildings, parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a capitol building.

Updated April 9 9:03 a.m. CT

An online conspiracy theorist from Maxwell, Texas was arrested Tuesday after allegedly storming the entrance to the U.S. Capitol building during the Jan. 6 insurrection, bringing the total number of Texans charged in the attack to at least 38.

Authorities say Andrew Morgan is a content creator who pushes QAnon conspiracy theories through his YouTube channel, and often filmed his interactions with police. On Jan. 6, Morgan recorded a video that appeared to show the man joining a standoff between rioters and police at the entrance of the U.S. Capitol building, according to court documents.

The nearly 21-minute long video allegedly shows Morgan making his way up the steps of the Capitol, and briefly entering the building, before being pushed back by police.

“I want my bullet! Give me my bullet! Give me my tear gas,” he yelled as he made his way to the entrance of the building, according to court documents.

During an interview, investigators say Morgan admitted he was at the Capitol covering what transpired, and described himself as an independent journalist and a "civil rights auditor."

According to the sworn affidavit, Morgan also said that the people who run the country “use child pedophilia to control the masses,” and that he was in line with both the nation’s founders and QAnon.

Morgan was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds, obstruction of an official proceeding, and aiding and abetting.

Below is a list of the Texans arrested for their alleged role in the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection. Click on each name to learn more.

Ryan Nichols and Alex Harkrider, Updated April 8 11:46 a.m. CT

Two Texas men armed with pepper spray, a crowbar and a baton traveled to the U.S. Capitol “planning a civil war” before joining a mob of pro-Trump rioters during the Jan. 6 insurrection, according to newly unsealed court documents.

Longview resident Ryan Nichols and Carthage resident Alex Harkrider made several posts on social media during the attack, uploading images featuring the men on Capitol grounds and inside the building itself, according to the FBI.

In a video obtained by agents, Nichols allegedly sprays what the FBI called pepper spray towards a door guarded by police. In another video obtained by the FBI, Nichols was said to proclaim: "This is the second revolution right here folks!" The FBI said it used photographic evidence uploaded by the men themselves to identify and charge them for their alleged participation.

The two men were initially identified by a pair of witnesses, one of whom contacted the FBI saying, “Alex stated they were planning a civil war," according to the unsealed arrest warrant.

In one photo, Nichols is holding a red bullhorn while Harkrider can be seen with a tactical vest under his jacket, according to court documents.

The two men were were allegedly motivated by their support for Donald Trump, according to the documents. In one social media post, Nichols purportedly sad that then-Vice President Mike Pence “better do the right thing, or we're going to MAKE you do the right thing," referring to the false idea that the vice president has the constitutional authority to overturn the election results.

Former President Donald Trump was one of the people to push that conspiracy theory, saying on social media, “The Vice President has the power to reject fraudulently chosen electors.”

There is also no credible evidence of widespread voter fraud or “fraudulently chosen electors” in the 2020 presidential election.

Additional reporting by Seamus Hughes from the Program on Extremism at George Washington University.

Grady Owens, Updated April 5, 3:53 p.m. CT

A Texas college student was arrested last week after federal agents said he hit an officer in the head with a skateboard during the attack on the U.S. Capitol, bringing the total number of Texans charged in the attack to at least 37.

In a sworn affidavit, agents said Grady Owens, 21, of Blanco, joined a group of rioters on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building and assaulted an officer with the deck. The officer sustained a concussion and an injury to his right pinky finger, according to court documents. The incident was captured through an officer's body camera.

About a month after the attack, the FBI said it found Owens' Instagram account through an open source search. The FBI then found a vehicle registered to Owens, and traced it to an apartment complex and college parking lot in Florida.

Authorities say they used Owens' Instagram to determine that he attended Full Sail University in Florida, and interviewed two employees of the college, who identified Owens.

Owens was charged with assaulting officers with a deadly or dangerous weapon, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

David Judd, Updated April 2, 9:32 a.m. CT

Authorities say David Judd, of North Dallas, allegedly joined a group of rioters near the Lower West Terrace tunnel and attempted to forcefully enter the Capitol building through a line of police officers. Security footage and videos posted to YouTube and Parler show Judd passing stolen police shields to other rioters and pushing against the line of officers, according to the FBI.

In one video, Judd allegedly lit an object on fire and threw it towards the line of officers, according to the sworn affidavit.

After the incident, two witnesses helped identify Judd for the FBI. One witness shared a social media post, which appeared to show Judd asking for a ride to the rally and providing his phone number, according to court documents.

"I'm a Texas Patriot and American First Supporter," he allegedly wrote. "I HAVE MY LICENSE TO CARRY A FIREARM."

Judd is now charged with assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers of employees and civil disorder.

Elizabeth Rose Williams and Bradley Bennett, Updated March 31, 8:37 a.m. CT

Authorities say Elizabeth Rose Williams, of Kerrville, and Bradley Bennett entered the Capitol building alongside other pro-Trump extremists during the attack. The FBI received shared images, text messages, and social media posts made by Bennett from tipsters that appear to show Bennett and Williams around and inside the Capitol building. One post on Facebook included a video that clearly showed both Bennett and Williams on Capitol grounds, according to court documents.

"We were flashbanged and hardcore tear gassed on the front steps of the Capitol before breach," read the Facebook post, according to court documents.

A person familiar with both Bennett and Williams identified the two for authorities, and shared screenshots from Bennett that read, "Today was so NUTS!! CAPITOL FULLY BREACHED."

The two are now being charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds, disorderly conduct, and obstruction of an official proceeding.

READ MORE | Texas Lifestyle Coach And Boyfriend Arrested For Joining Capitol Insurrection, FBI Says

Christian Cortez and Benjamin Larocca, Updated March 29, 1:03 p.m. CT

Authorities say Christian Cortez and Benjamin Larocca, both of Seabrook, drove a rental car to Washington, D.C. to attend the march, and entered the Capitol building during the attack. The two men were identified using footage recorded throughout the day, according to court documents.

In one video, Cortez appears on Capitol grounds near a line of officers, alongside other pro-Trump extremists.

“Oath breakers! Oath breakers!,” he yells toward a line of officers, according to court documents.

As the video continues, court documents say Cortez could be seen continuing to yell at the officers while moving closer to the line. Cortez then appears to be sprayed with pepper spray by one of the officers, according to a sworn affidavit.

READ MORE | 2 More Houston-Area Men Arrested For Joining Capitol Insurrection, FBI Says

Kevin Blakely, Updated March 24, 10:09 a.m. CT

Authorities say they identified Kevin Blakely, of McKinney, after recovering several publicly posted videos and photos, showing the man on Capitol grounds and inside the building alongside pro-Trump extremists.

Investigators also tracked the location of Blakely's phone at the time of the attack, according to court documents. The FBI said his phone was inside the Capitol building for nearly two hours during the riot.

Blakely is now being charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds, disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Joseph Barnes and Treniss Evans, Updated March 19, 10:01 a.m. CT

Joseph Barnes from Austin and Treniss Evans from San Antonio both allegedly entered the Capitol building alongside pro-trump extremists, according to court documents.

The FBI said three witnesses identified Barnes after he appeared in a video recorded from within the Capitol building. Throughout the video, Barnes appears to be chanting along with other rioters.

“This is our house! This is our country!,” he yelled, according to court documents.

Barnes has since been arrested and is now charged with obstruction of an official proceeding, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Court documents reveal that Evans was identified by an anonymous tipster who told the FBI Evans had allegedly taken a shot of fireball inside Nancy Pelosi's office and had recorded videos on his cellphone during the incident.

Several days later, the FBI was sent a video that appeared to feature Evans speaking into a megaphone on the steps of the Capitol.

“I don't support looting, I don't support the violence, I support a peaceful protest to put them on notice that we the people demand justice,” he said to the crowd, according to court documents.

Evans is now charged with obstruction of an official proceeding, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Jeffrey Witcher and Richard Barnard, Updated March 15, 12:31 p.m. CT

Jeffrey Witcher and Richard Barnard, both U.S. Marine veterans, allegedly entered the Capitol building alongside pro-Trump extremists, according to court documents. Once inside, court documents allege the two men took several photos and videos on their phones.

Federal agents say Witcher had attempted to delete the footage he recorded while inside the building, but the FBI was able to recover the deleted evidence by clicking on the “recently deleted” folder in his phone.

In one of the videos, Witcher appears to be walking towards a line of police officers, while chanting, "I am in the White House! We crashed this. Our house! We did it!", accordint to court documents.

According to the FBI, Witcher told agents that he became emotional during the incident and had forgotten that he was actually inside of the Capitol building, and not the White House.

Richard Barnard appears alongside Witcher in several photos and videos taken inside the Capitol building, according to court documents. In an interview with FBI agents, Barnard said that he helped shield police from a crowd of rioters and that he stayed inside of the building for 15-20 minutes, the FBI said.

The two men are now facing federal charges, including unlawful entry on restricted building or grounds, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a capitol building. Jeffrey Witcher is also being charged with obstruction of an official proceeding.

Shane Leedon Jenkins, Updated March 7, 7:40 p.m. CT

A Houston resident was arrested Friday for his alleged involvement in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. At least 26 Texans are now facing charges.

Tips received from an unidentified individual led the FBI to several publicly available videos showing Shane Leedon Jenkins smashing a window with a hatchet and throwing a flagpole and a metal pipe at federal officers, according to court documents.

Investigators say they also found social media accounts linked to Jenkins, where a video was uploaded by Jenkins himself at the riot. Additionally, Jenkins can also be seen in video footage captured by security cameras and body cams worn by Capitol police, according to court documents.

A parole officer, who had been assigned to Jenkins for several years, reportedly identified Jenkins for authorities using publicly posted photographs.

Jenkins is now facing federal charges, including: assault on a federal officer, destruction of federal property, civil disorder, knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds, disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds, and knowingly engaging in violence in any restricted building or grounds.

Daniel Ray Caldwell and Luke Coffee, Updated March 1, 4:27 p.m. CT

Two more Texans have been arrested for their alleged involvement in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

In video footage obtained by law enforcement, Daniel Ray Caldwell, 49, from The Colony, is seen assaulting federal agents and engaging in disruptive or disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, according to court documents. Caldwell is seen spraying a mist towards police officers who were attempting to stop rioters from getting up the Capitol steps.

In another video obtained by authorities, Caldwell is seen inside a nearby hotel, reportedly after the attack, according to court documents.

"They sprayed us with pepper spray," Caldwell said in the video. "I was like, ‘Dude, do it again and I'll spray you back,' and he did, and I sprayed back. I got like 15 [officers] and that's when they shot me with that big cannon with rubber bullets."

Caldwell is now being charged with assaulting federal officers, obstructing law enforcement, knowingly entering a restricted building and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Dallas resident Luke Coffee, 41, was also arrested for allegedly using a crutch to assault police officers during the attack on the Capitol. Bodycam footage shows Coffee picking up the crutch and holding it over his head near the Lower Terrace entrance of the Capitol building, according to court documents. Coffee then appears to direct his attention towards the line of officers guarding the entrance, as he allegedly begins to use the crutch as a weapon.

According to the FBI, it took two officers to hold back Coffee as he charged into the line. Coffee is now being charged with obstruction of an official proceeding, interference with a law enforcement officer during civil disorder, unlawful entry on restricted grounds and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Katherine Schwab and Jason Hyland, Updated Feb. 8, 2:04 p.m. CT

Realtors Katherine Schwab and Jason Hyland both allegedly traveled to D.C. with Frisco realtor Jennifer Ryan and two other unidentified people, according to court documents. The group flew from Denton to D.C. via a private plane to attend Trump’s Jan. 6 rally, court records show.

Both Hyland and Schwab told investigators that after seeing that the Capitol had been breached, the group decided to see what was happening firsthand, according to a sworn affidavit from federal law enforcement. Court records allege that Ryan posted a 21-minute livestream on Facebook that showed the group walking towards the Capitol. Both Hyland and Schwab appear in the video, according to court documents.

Once at the Capitol, the affidavit said Hyland asked a police officer if he could go inside the building, with the officer allegedly responding, “everyone else is.” Hyland told investigators that he went inside the building along with Ryan and Schwab, and stayed inside for a short amount of time. After hearing what sounded like a flash bang, Hyland reportedly left the building.

Surveillance footage from inside the Capitol building shows what appears to be both Schwab and Hyland entering the building through the Rotunda door.

When asked on Facebook if she was able to get pictures from within the building, Schwab confirmed that she was inside, according to the affidavit.

“no because they closed the door behind us and had their guns drawn at a few…interesting though, the national guard was in there and didn’t move an inch. They sat back. They didn’t fight against us at all…because there was no need to. After the girl was shot and killed that’s when we raised hell,” she wrote, according to court records.

The FBI said it identified both Hyland and Schwab through Ryan’s social media posts and through surveillance footage from inside the Capitol building. They are now being charged with disorderly conduct and knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority.

Ryan Zink, Updated Feb. 5, 4:59 p.m. CT

Ryan Zink, son of Arizona congressional candidate Jeff Zink, was arrested in Lubbock Thursday after being accused of participating in last month's Capitol insurrection. At least 21 people are now facing charges after the attack. Zink posted several images of himself on Facebook during the attack, according to court documents. In a video, someone who appears to be Zink can be seen saying, "We knocked down the gates! We're storming the Capitol! You can't stop us!" In an interview with KCBD, Arizona congressional candidate Jeff Zink said that his son was innocent. He told the KCBD reporter that he and his son were there to peacefully protest, and left after the riot began. "He didn't breach the Capitol building at all," he said. However, in a private message on Facebook, Ryan Zink tells a different story, according to court records: "Literally inside the capital shots fired on the floor there is a fire and gas and flash bangs have been used multiple serious injuries reported," he reportedly wrote. According to court documents, Zink was identified by authorities after an unidentified person shared Zink's Facebook with the FBI. He's now facing federal charges for obstructing an official proceeding and trespassing in a restricted building.

Wilmar Montano Alvarado, Updated Jan. 29, 1:42 p.m. CT

Wilmar Montano Alvarado was arrested by FBI Houston agents in relation to the U.S. Capitol attack. He is the third Houston-area resident to be arrested after the incident, joining former HPD officer Tam Dinh Pham and Spring resident Joshua R. Lollar. Alvarado was accused of entering the Capitol building on Jan. 6 and joining rioters who were forcibly making their way through a line of police officers guarding the building's west entrance, according to court documents. MORE | 3rd Houston-Area Man Arrested In Connection With U.S. Capitol Attack

Daniel Phipps, Updated Jan. 28, 9:02 a.m. CT

Garland Resident Daniel Phipps was arrested Tuesday after law enforcement said they discovered evidence on social media that he took part in the Capitol insurrection. In several posts attached to a federal affidavit, someone purported to be Phipps can be seen in what appears to be the inside of the Capitol building. “I went to DC. I helped take the Hill," he said in one Facebook post, according to court documents. Phipps was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds.

Chance and James Uptmore, Updated Jan. 28, 9:02 a.m. CT

Chance Uptmore, and his father James Uptmore, both allegedly entered the Capitol building during the insurrection. Like many others who were present during the attack, Chance Uptmore was active on social media, according to the FBI. One Facebook comment attached to a sworn affidavit allegedly written by the son indicated that he was inside the Capitol, and described what it was like inside the building: "When a painting was grabbed off the wall we helped the cops recover it. The cops were saying stuff like ‘we stand with you' ‘thanks for being here' ‘you made your point now leave calmly' I have it all on tape," he said. According to court documents, the FBI identified the younger Uptmore using his social media posts and still images found on several news outlets, including British publication the Telegraph. After the FBI executed a federal search warrant on the Uptmore residence, investigators say both father and son confessed to being at the Capitol during the attack. According to court documents, James Uptmore had followed his son into the building after advising him not to enter. Both father and son are now being charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds.

Garrett Miller, Updated Jan. 23, 1:23 p.m CT

A Dallas-area man accused of making online threats against U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was charged in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 insurrection. Garrett Miller appeared before a federal judge Friday after the FBI discovered social media posts that show the man storming the entrance to the Capitol building and at least one video inside the Capitol rotunda waving pro-Trump and American flags with the caption, “From inside congress,” according to a sworn affidavit. Social media posts attached to the affidavit appear to show Miller in the week leading up to the pro-Trump riot making plans to travel to the Capitol with "a grappling hook and rope and a level 3 vest. Helmets mouth guard and bump cap," adding that the last time he attended a pro-Trump rally in D.C. he "had a lot of guns.” Responding to one Twitter user who claimed the rioters were “paid infiltraitors,” Miller tweeted, “Nah we stormed it,” according to the affidavit. Another screenshot purportedly from Miller’s Twitter account simply reads, “Assassinate @AOC” — the Twitter handle of Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Under one Facebook photo from inside the Capitol, someone commented, "bro you got in?! Nice!," to which Miller replied, "just wanted to incriminate myself a little lol," according to the affidavit. He has been charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted buildings or grounds without lawful authority; violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; obstructing or impeding any official proceeding; and certain acts during civil disorder.
A screenshot from Twitter attached to a charging document for Dallas-area man Garret Miller.

Nolan Cooke, Updated Jan. 23, 1:23 p.m CT

Another north Texas man, Nolan Cooke, who according to court records lives near the Oklahoma border about an hour north of Dallas, was arrested after agents say he posted an approximately 28-second GoPro video on TikTok from the Capitol. The video, which was posted on Jan. 13, appeared to show a crowd shoving its way past what looked like U.S. Capitol police, according to court records. In an affidavit, one agent said they observed long brown hair that matched Nolan's, and the sleeve of a denim jacket or shirt that matched photos on his Instagram account. The FBI also discovered a social media photo of Cooke and a woman believed to be his girlfriend, captioned, "I wouldn't want anyone other than you with me to take on the revolution," according to court records. The photo, which is attached to the affidavit, also appears to show Cooke wearing a "Trump 2020" hat. When confronted by the FBI on Jan. 20, Cooke admitted that he and his girlfriend were driven to the Capitol by a family member, and were at the front of the line pushing against police at the building, according to the agent's sworn affidavit. The court document also alleged that Cooke brought one or more guns on the trip but left them in the vehicle, and that he "came to the Capitol because he wanted to be heard. He denied entering the building. Cooke has been charged with entering or remaining on restricted buildings or grounds; disorderly or disruptive conduct in or near restricted buildings or grounds; unlawful activities on Capitol grounds; and acts during civil disorder.

Christopher Ray Grider, Updated Jan. 23, 1:23 p.m CT

Christopher Ray Grider, reportedly of Eddy, Texas, was arrested by federal law enforcement after admitting to TV reporters he took part in the insurrection. "The president asked people to come and show their support I feel like it's the least that we can do, it's kind of why I came from central Texas all the way to DC," he told KWTX in Waco. In the interview, Grider said he was near Ashli Babbitt when she was shot and killed outside the "Speaker's Lobby" near the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives. “(Rioters) were shocked as everyone else was when the people on the other side of the door, from 20 feet away, shot her in the chest,” he said. “At that point we were all panicked, we couldn't leave because there were thousands of people behind us pushing us forward.” FBI agents later corroborated the details of the interview using social media photos and video, according to a sworn affidavit from one of the agents. Screenshots attached to the affidavit appear to show Grider with a yellow “Don't Tread on Me” flag tied around his neck like a backwards cape, and a red “Make America Great Again” cap. In one video, the agent said he can be seen handing a helmet to one fellow rioter, who used it to smash glass doors inside the Capitol. Grider then tried to climb through the doors, according to the affidavit. The agent also said he could be seen trying to push through the doors to the House chamber. Grider was charged with damage to government property, knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds.

Nick DeCarlo, Updated Jan. 20 1:33 p.m. CT

According to a sworn affidavit, Texan and alt-right personality Nick DeCarlo entered the U.S. Capitol building alongside Nick Ochs, leader of the Hawaiian branch of the Proud Boys. In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, DeCarlo said he and Ochs were at the Capitol working as journalists for MT Media — or, "Murder the Media" — a right-wing California-based company. However, in a nearly hour-long interview with a fellow "Murder the Media" member, DeCarlo told a different story. "Me and Nick Ochs went there specifically to stop the steal," he said, referring to the unfounded election fraud claims pushed by President Trump. “You’re welcome America,” he later added. The FBI used images posted on social media by the two men to identify and apprehend them shortly after the insurrection, according to court documents.
According to the FBI, this Jan. 6, 2021 photo attached to a federal affidavit shows Texan Nick DeCarlo, right, alongside his “Murder The Media” partner Nick Ochs at the U.S. Capitol.

Tam Dinh Pham, Updated Jan. 19, 3:04 p.m. CT

Eighteen-year HPD veteran and Richmond resident Tam Dinh Pham was charged on Jan. 19 with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on capitol grounds. In an affidavit filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Pham was accused of unlawfully entering the U.S. Capitol Building along with throngs of other pro-Trump extremists, marching from the morning’s Donald Trump rally to the Capitol, where he allegedly climbed over knocked-down fences, passed through the barriers and entered the Capitol rotunda. Images and video screenshots attached to the affidavit appear to show Pham inside carrying a Trump flag. MORE | HPD Officer Charged With Taking Part In U.S. Capitol Insurrection

Matthew Carl Mazzocco, Updated Feb. 10, 3:22 p.m. CT

San Antonio resident Matthew Carl Mazzocco, 37, of San Antonio was arrested on Jan. 17, after allegedly posting several images on Facebook that show him on U.S. Capitol grounds and inside the building itself during the attack, according to court documents.

One screenshot attached to a sworn affidavit appears to show a Facebook post featuring Mazzocco outside the Capitol building, with the caption "The capital is ours!"

A Facebook screenshot attached to a federal affidavit appears to show San Antonio resident Matthew Carl Mazzocco at the U.S. Capitol.

A person who appears to be Mazzocco appears in several videos taken by other people from within the Capitol building, according to court documents. During the video, Mazzocco is seen telling others not to take or destroy anything, and that they were probably going to get in trouble for what they were doing, according to the affidavit.

An unnamed coworker, who had known Mazzocco for almost four years, identified him in the video when questioned by authorities.

Following the attack, an unidentified person, who belonged to the same youth sports league as Mazzocco, shared the images on Mazzocco's Facebook page to the FBI, according to court documents. Using Mazzocco's own social media posts, and footage captured by others at the riot, authorities were able to identify Mazzocco.

Daniel Adams, Updated Jan. 19 11:31 a.m. CT

Four more Texans have been charged in the aftermath of the U.S. Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6, bringing the total to at least eight across the state. East Texas resident Daniel Adams was arrested in the Houston area after allegedly confronting authorities on Capitol ground with his cousin, Cody Connell, from Louisiana. Video footage recorded by both men showed Adams and Connell in what appears to be a physical altercation with officers on the steps of the Capitol, according to court documents. Both men allegedly used social media to share their experience at the Capitol, with several posts making their way to the FBI, who said they then used the images to identify the two men.

Guy Reffitt, Updated Jan. 19 11:31 a.m. CT

Guy Reffitt, 48, of Wylie, was seen “at or past the police line protecting” the Capitol building, wearing black body armor, according to court documents. Days later, court documents say Reffitt realized the FBI was watching him, and he became increasingly suspicious of his own family. His family told the FBI that he became more hostile towards them as time went on, going as far as to seemingly threaten his own children, according to the criminal complaint. "If you turn me in, you're a traitor and you know what happens to traitors... traitors get shot," Reffitt allegedly told his two children.He was arrested soon after, while the FBI executed a search warrant at his home.

Jenna Ryan, Updated Jan. 19 11:31 a.m. CT

Jenna Ryan, 50, a Realtor from Frisco, flew to D.C. with others aboard a small private plane, according to court documents. Images posted onto Ryan’s social media pages appeared to show her at the Capitol building. During a 21-minute livestream on Facebook, Ryan is allegedly shown entering the Capitol building, saying "y'all know who to hire for your realtor. Jenna Ryan for your realtor," according to court documents. Days after the insurrection, Ryan defended her alleged participation on several news outlets. After she was arrested by the FBI, she told CBS 11 in Dallas-Fort Worth that she believed President Trump should pardon all who were involved in the riot. “He asked us to fly there. He asked us to be there. So I was doing what he asked us to do," she said.

Troy Smocks, Updated Jan. 19 11:31 a.m. CT

Troy Smocks, 58, from Dallas, flew from Texas to D.C. on Jan. 5, according to court documents. He was allegedly an avid user of the now-deactivated social media app Parler, and prosecutors said he used his account on Jan. 6 to post: “many of us will return on January 19th.” He added that those who won’t join on the 19th should “take a few vacation days” during that time, according to court documents. On Jan. 7, Smocks allegedly posted: “We took the Capital. They have it back now, only because We left. It wasn't the building that We wanted. . . it was them!"

Joshua Lollar, Updated Jan. 15, 7:38 p.m. CT

Joshua Lollar, from Spring, was accused of storming the Capitol and clashing with police officers after attending the rally by President Donald Trump on Jan. 6. The FBI reviewed photos and videos on Lollar's Facebook account, which appeared to show him busting into the building and in a crowd that was trying to push through a line of police officers, according to court documents.

Larry Brock, Updated Jan. 15, 7:38 p.m. CT

Grapevine resident and Air Force combat veteran Larry Brock was seen inside the capitol building wearing green body armor and carrying zip-tie handcuffs, according to court documents. After several images of someone appearing to be Brock began to surface online, family members and friends confirmed his identity to the FBI. Brock told the New Yorker that he intended to be peaceful, and wore his body armor because he “didn't want to get stabbed or hurt.” As for the zip-tie handcuffs, Brock said he found them on the ground and had intended to “give them to an officer.”

Jenny Cudd and Eliel Rosa, Updated Jan. 15, 7:38 p.m. CT

Jenny Cudd, a former Midland mayoral candidate, and Eliel Rosa, a Midland resident, both entered the Capitol building during the riot, according to court documents. Once inside, Cudd allegedly helped break down Nancy Pelosi's office door, a detail Cudd confirmed via a livestream on Facebook. During the livestream, Cudd expressed the pride she felt as she participated in the “revolution.” Security camera footage, photos, and Cudd's own Facebook livestreams allowed the FBI to identify both Cudd and Rosa. Upon questioning, the FBI said Rosa admitted that he and Cudd had entered the U.S. Capitol.

Florian Martin contributed to this report.

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