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Indicted in Office in Texas: Tuesday’s Show (February 2, 2016)

If politics is indeed the art of the possible, does that possibility lessen when you’re under indictment? With Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton facing this reality, we explore the history of elected officials in Texas in charge while being charged on this edition of Houston Matters. We welcome your questions for Brandon Rottinghaus, an associate professor […]

If politics is indeed the art of the possible, does that possibility lessen when you’re under indictment? With Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton facing this reality, we explore the history of elected officials in Texas in charge while being charged on this edition of Houston Matters.

We welcome your questions for Brandon Rottinghaus, an associate professor of political science at the University of Houston, as he shares examples of how indicted officials in Texas faced personal legal entanglements while holding elective office, just like the Lone Star state’s current Attorney General.

Also this hour: Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer have a scary road ahead. According to the CDC, it causes more deaths than any other female reproductive system cancer. In an effort to ease suffering and fear — and hopefully encourage positive results in treatment — MD Anderson Fellow Dr. Lauren Prescott spearheaded a pilot study examining the value of “shared medical appointments,” where women diagnosed with ovarian cancer learn about their treatment together. She tells Houston Matters producer Paige Phelps about it. (Prescott’s study was published this month in the Journal of Gynecologic Oncology).

Then: An article in the Houston Chronicle last month explored how more women are being brought into company boardrooms in Houston. With more young women encouraged to enter STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers and older execs retiring, the trend may continue. We discuss this and other ways Houston’s boardrooms may be changing with Stephen Newton, the Houston and Dallas area manager for the executive search firm Russel Reynolds Associates, and Barbara Duganier, a retired Accenture executive who now serves on several public company boards.

Plus: Coloring books aren’t just for kids anymore, apparently. Edel Howlin reports on a new generation of Houston adults unwinding by drawing inside the lines. Yes. Really.

Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.

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