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New Study In Texas Finds Liver Cancer Diagnosis And Treatment Can Vary By Race

Studies had already shown the rates of liver cancer among Blacks and Hispanics are nearly double that of Caucasians

Doctors reviewed records of 1,100 patients diagnosed at Parkland and UTSW for the study.

A new study seeking detailed information about the ongoing increase in liver cancer in the U.S. found racial and ethnic differences in the outcomes.

Studies had already shown the rates of liver cancer among Blacks and Hispanics are nearly double that of Caucasians, and their mortality rates are also higher.

However, Dr. Amit Singal of UT Southwestern Medical Center wanted to know more.

“But those studies actually don’t have granular data on several factors that you would think would be important,” he said, “like liver function, tumor stage, and access to care.”

Singal and other researchers studied records of 1,100 patients diagnosed at Parkland and UT Southwestern Medical Center (mostly male, about a third each white, black and Hispanic). They found racial and ethnic differences in outcomes: Blacks and Hispanics less likely than whites to get early diagnosis and curative treatment, and blacks less likely to survive.

Singal says much of this stems from lack of access to screening for the disease.

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