U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter’s brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound.

U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter’s brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound.

U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter's brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound.

Credit: Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS

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From the article: Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter’s Brain At Risk

U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter’s brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound.

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