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Ex-Texas Congressman Steve Stockman Found Guilty On 23 Of 24 Counts

The jury ruled former Congressman Steve Stockman not guilty on one count of wire fraud. Judge Lee Rosenthal ordered him remanded to custody, pending his sentencing hearing in August.

Steve Stockman
Steve and Patti Stockman emerging from Houston’s federal courthouse, April 5, 2017

A federal jury has found former Congressman Steve Stockman guilty of masterminding a scheme to divert more than $1 million in charitable contributions to pay for campaign and personal expenses.

The jurors ruled Stockman guilty on 23 of the 24 criminal counts against him. The sole not-guilty verdict came on one count of wire fraud. The remaining guilty verdicts included three counts of wire fraud, four counts of mail fraud, 10 counts of money laundering, three election law violations, and one case of filing a false tax return.

The prosecution asked Judge Lee Rosenthal to remand Stockman to custody, pending sentencing. Justice Department attorney Robert Heberle argued that Stockman presented a flight risk. The judge concurred. Both sides in the trial presented evidence of Stockman’s extensive foreign contacts, many of them in countries from which extraditing a fugitive would prove difficult.

Speaking on Stockman’s behalf, defense attorney Sean Buckley said, “He’s very disappointed and sad that he won’t be going home with his wife. But he is keeping his head up. He’s strong. He’s a survivor, as he always has been.”

“Moving forward, we’re going to work hard on the sentencing portion, and we will see what happens with the appeal after the sentencing as well,” said Gary Tabakman, another attorney on Stockman’s defense team.

Judge Rosenthal scheduled Stockman’s sentencing hearing for Friday, August 17 at 9:30 a.m..

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Andrew Schneider

Andrew Schneider

Politics and Government Reporter

Andrew heads Houston Public Media’s coverage of national, state, and local elections. He also reports on major policy issues before the Texas delegations in the U.S. House and Senate, as well as the Texas governorship, the state legislature, and county and city governments. Before taking up his current post, Andrew...

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