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Search For Motive In Austin Bombings Continues, U.S. Attorney Says

Authorities were weighing the public’s desire to know what was on the bomber’s recorded confession against public safety concerns

U.S. Attorney John Bash and other federal and local law enforcement officials provide an update into the Austin serial bombings investigation.

A judge has dismissed a complaint against confessed Austin bomber Mark Conditt now that his body has been identified and released to his family, U.S. Attorney John Bash said today. The investigation into a motive is ongoing, he added.

At an afternoon news conference with other law enforcement officials, Bash said there is no other suspect in last month’s bombings, which killed two people and seriously injured four others.

“We are looking through very voluminous computer records to examine his intent and motivations,” Bash said, “and so there is still an ongoing investigation, and we do urge the public to remain vigilant about suspicious packages and to contact the APD if you notice a suspicious package.”

He said there’s no reason to believe any additional bombs will be found, however. 

U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Lane unsealed an affidavit earlier Monday for an arrest warrant for Conditt, who killed himself in a car along I-35 in Round Rock as a SWAT team closed in on him March 21. 

The affidavit says all six bombs had elements in common, including shrapnel and the same type of battery holder bought by someone who appears to be Conditt using a credit card that belonged to him.

It also says surveillance video shows a man who appears to be Conditt buying a “Drive Like Your Kids Here” sign like one used to conceal a bomb that injured two people in the Travis Country neighborhood. In the same transaction, the man bought gloves consistent with those worn by the person who sent two packages later revealed to contain bombs from a Sunset Valley FedEx store.  

FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs said authorities were weighing the public’s desire to know what was on the bomber’s recorded confession against public safety concerns.

“We are concerned that it could inspire other people to do other acts,” he said. “The subject in the audio confession says a number of statements that concern us and we just don’t want that to live forever on the Internet.”

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