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Nonprofit Works To Help Struggling Families With A Basic Childcare Need

They’re calling it the “diaper gap.” Groups are now stepping up to make sure babies stay dry and healthy.

At the downtown Houston nonprofit Bread of Life, a line snaked around the corner Wednesday morning as people waited to receive donations of food and household items.

Bread of Life Executive Director Catherine Flowers said many of these people are still struggling after Hurricane Harvey’s floods. And because of Bread of Life’s massive distribution efforts they’re now serving people from all over the Houston region.

“These are people who just need that extra to make it through the week,” explained Flowers. “People aren’t standing in a line if they don’t have a need. And so being able to meet people where they are certainly not only feels good, it’s why we do it.”

At Wednesday’s event, families also received something else that’s desperately needed, and that’s diapers for their babies and toddlers.

The effort was coordinated in part by the Texas Diaper Bank, a group working to supply diapers to low-income families. The organization recently got a donation of 250,000 diapers to distribute to families recovering from Harvey.

Texas Diaper Bank Executive Director Jorge Medina said some families have gotten so desperate that they actually try to recycle disposable diapers. And that can lead to all kinds of problems.

“It creates the propensity for infections, for diaper rash,” said Medina. “And then the parent is going to have to end up taking the child to a clinic or to the hospital.”

The cost of diapering isn’t cheap. Medina said it can run as high as $150 a month for just one child.

If you’d like to learn more about Bread of Life’s services in Houston you can find details on their website. The Texas Diaper Bank also has information online as well.

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Gail Delaughter

Transportation Reporter

From early-morning interviews with commuters to walks through muddy construction sites, Gail covers all aspects of getting around Houston. That includes walking, driving, cycling, taking the bus, and occasionally flying. Before she became transportation reporter in 2011, Gail hosted weekend programs for Houston Public Media. She's also covered courts in...

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