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Houston Has Been Losing Banks Every Year Since The Great Recession

It’s part of a nationwide trend and new technology has a lot do with it

Bank teller counting money. Bialas anticipates the trend of bank closings to continue as more transactions are being done online.

In 2017, Houston had 108 fewer bank branches than in 2010 – that’s a 6.9 percent decrease.

It’s part of a nationwide trend since the Great Recession.

Walter Bialas, a vice president at commercial real estate firm JLL, which published the report, said for banks it’s no longer about having the most branches.

“Customers pretty much across the country are mandating that it’s not just about the branch on the corner,” he said. “It’s about being able to do business with their bank anytime, anywhere for pretty much anything.”

Research by the New York Fed and others shows so-called “bank deserts” disproportionately affect minority and low-income communities.

Bialas anticipates the trend of bank closings to continue as more transactions are being done online.

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Florian Martin

Florian Martin

Business Reporter

Florian Martin is currently the News 88.7 business reporter. Florian’s stories can frequently be heard on other public radio stations throughout Texas and on NPR nationwide. Some of them have earned him awards from Texas AP Broadcasters and the Houston Press Club. Florian is a native of Germany. His studies...

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