The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error.

The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error.

The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error.

Credit: Cory Lum/AP

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From the article: Worker Who Sent Hawaii False Alert Thought Missile Attack Was Imminent

The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error.

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