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UPDATE: Authorities Build-Up Profile of Las Vegas Gunman, Still No Motive Established

As investigators examine several crime scenes, they still have not determined the shooter’s motive.

 

People hold hands in prayer while hiding inside an airplane hangar after a mass shooting in which dozens were killed at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas.

THE LATEST ON THE LAS VEGAS SHOOTING:

 

Authorities say the gunman in the Las Vegas shooting set up cameras inside and outside the hotel room where he opened fire on the crowd at a country music concert.

Sheriff Joe Lombardo said at a news conference Tuesday that he believes shooter Stephen Craig Paddock set up the cameras to see if anyone was coming to take him into custody. He did not release further details.

The sheriff also said authorities had completed their investigation at the gunman’s property in Reno, finding five handguns, two shotguns and a plethora of ammunition.

Authorities say Paddock killed 59 people and injured more than 500 others when he opened fire Sunday night on an outdoor country music concert from a 32nd floor hotel tower.

Hospital officials say 50 people remain in critical condition after being wounded.

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The Las Vegas gunman who killed nearly 60 people at a country music festival worked as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, an IRS agent and in an auditing department over a 10-year period.

A spokeswoman for the Office of Personnel Management told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Stephen Paddock’s employment included about two years as a mail carrier from 1976 to 1978.

After that, he worked as an agent for the Internal Revenue Service for six years until 1984. And then he worked a defense auditing job for about 18 months.

The information helped complete the timeline surrounding the 64-year-old Paddock’s life. He graduated from college in 1977 from Cal State Northridge and also worked for a defense contractor in the late 1980s.

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A concertgoer from Washington state says he hid under bleachers with his wife when shots rang out in Las Vegas and victims started falling to the ground.

Jeff Bannerman told KOMO News Radio “just when you thought the thing was over, the rat-a-tat-tat would start again. So, we just absolutely were paralyzed underneath the bleachers.”

A man in front of Bannerman was shot and a garbage can that Bannerman had been leaning on was hit.

Bannerman and his wife Deanna joined others trying to help victims who could not move, dragging them “wherever you could to get them out of the way.”

He says he had blood on his hands and shoes and one of the women he tried to help “didn’t make it.”

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More than a dozen investigators, most wearing jackets marked “FBI” and all in blue protective booties, arrived in unmarked sedans and entered the concert site Tuesday to pick through the scene for clues.

The site inspection was visible by The Associated Press videographers from the 35th floor of the Mandalay Bay tower — three floors above the suite where Stephen Craig Paddock launched his barrage and later killed himself.

Authorities say 59 people were killed and more than 500 were injured Sunday night.

Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt compared the scene with a war zone. Laxalt is a former U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps member.

“Shoes, baby strollers, chairs, sunglasses, purses. The whole field was just littered with things,” Laxalt said Monday. “There were blood stains everywhere.”

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Hospital officials say Tuesday that at least 45 people remain in critical condition after being wounded at a mass shooting at a Las Vegas music festival on Sunday.

Sunrise Hospital has 33 people and University Medical Center has 12 people still in critical condition as of Tuesday morning.

Authorities say Stephen Craig Paddock killed 59 people and injured more than 500 others when he opened fire Sunday night on an outdoor country music concert from a 32nd floor hotel tower.

A motive is unknown.

At Sunrise, a total of 68 people remain hospitalized out of the 214 initially admitted. Officials say 15 people have died there.

Officials say a total of 60 people remain hospitalized out of the 104 who were taken to University Medical. Four have died.

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White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has singled out a Philadelphia financial planner as a hero during Sunday night’s mass shooting in Las Vegas.

Sanders told reporters Monday that Mike McGarry lay atop younger people at the country music concert targeted by a gunman in a nearby hotel.

McGarry told KYW-TV that he did it because, “I’m 53, they’re in their 20s. I lived a decent life so far, I’d rather them live longer than me.”

McGarry didn’t realize he’d been praised nationally because he was on a flight home when Sanders addressed the media. He says his wife, a registered nurse, was more of a hero than him — putting a tourniquet on one of those wounded.

McGarry says, “We’re just trying to help other people. I don’t think I did anything spectacular.”

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President Donald Trump is calling the man who killed 59 people and wounded hundreds others at a music festival in Las Vegas a “very, very sick individual.”

Trump spoke to reporters Tuesday as he departed for a trip to hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. He called the gunman “demented” and said “we’re looking into him very seriously.”

Trump also praised Las Vegas police, saying they had done an “incredible job.”

Trump stressed that the shooting was a tragedy. Asked about gun laws, the president said “we’ll be talking about gun laws as time goes by.”

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Headliner Jason Aldean took to social media to speak to fans a day after a gunman opened fire during his set at a country music festival.

Aldean wrote on Instagram that his “heart aches for the victims and their families.”

Sixty-four-year-old Stephen Paddock rained bullets down on the tens of thousands of people who were watching Aldean perform. The attack killed 59 and wounded 527.

The country star pleaded for people to stand together and “stop the hate.”

Authorities have not yet disclosed a motive for the attack.

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Less than 24 hours after the massacre at an open-air country music concert in Las Vegas, authorities are still piecing together what shooter Stephen Paddock did in preparation for his deadly shooting rampage that left 59 people dead and 527 others injured.

There is still a lot they don’t know about what motivated Paddock, described by officials as a “lone wolf,” to launch the most deadly mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

In a news conference Monday afternoon, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said his deputies are still processing four crime scenes: the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, from where Paddock shot his victims about 500 yards below; the venue at the Route 91 Harvest festival concert; Paddock’s home in Mesquite, NV, about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas; and another home in Reno in northern Nevada.

Lombardo initially said that 16 weapons were found in Paddock’s hotel room, where he had been staying since Sept. 28. Scopes were attached to “some of the rifles,” he added without more detail. Investigators found an additional 18 firearms in Paddock’s Mesquite home, as well as several thousand rounds of ammunition and explosives. They also found several pounds of ammonium nitrate, a key component for making a bomb, in Paddock’s car.

Still, the investigation is fast-moving and fluid as, four hours later, the gun count increased. In an early evening news conference, Assistant Sheriff Todd Fasulo said that 23, not 16, weapons had been found in the Mandalay Bay hotel room and 19, not 18 weapons had been discovered in Paddock’s Mesquite home.

Also, the office of Rep. Adam Schiff, (D-Calif.) said that he had been briefed by the FBI and informed that some, but not all of the weapons found in the hotel room were fully automatic. It was not clear whether those weapons were manufactured as fully automatic or whether Paddock had converted them.

Law enforcement officers had conducted a floor by floor search beginning on the 29th floor. Upon arriving at Paddock’s suite on the 32nd floor, they announced themselves. Paddock responded by shooting through the door, wounding a security guard in the leg, Lombardo said.

“They received gunfire. They backed off and SWAT responded,” said a somber Lombardo. They entered the room to find Paddock dead. The sheriff said investigators believe Paddock killed himself.

Lombardo also said that he had dispatched a SWAT team to examine Paddock’s house in northern Nevada to make sure there are no booby traps.

Many questions remain unanswered.

Lombardo said investigators still have not identified Paddock’s motive for the shooting. Paddock’s brother, Eric Paddock, of Orlando, FL, said he was a wealthy retired accountant and high stakes gambler.

“There’s no political affiliation that we know of. There’s no religious affiliation that we know of,” Eric Paddock told reporters earlier in the day.

Investigators also don’t know how Paddock managed to assemble such a large arsenal of weapons in his hotel suite. Lombardo said that his team is still working on the origins of the arsenal, saying that one gun dealer in Nevada has stepped forward to say that he had sold one firearm to Paddock. When asked whether he would characterize Paddock’s firearms as “assault weapons,” Lombardo simply said, “Yes.”

Earlier in the day, President Trump, appearing before reporters at the White House, said that he would visit Las Vegas on Wednesday.

He called the mass shooting “an act of pure evil,” adding “In moments of tragedy and horror, America comes together as one — and it always has.”

The mayor of Las Vegas, Carolyn Goodman, summed up the mood of the many local and state officials gathered for an afternoon news conference.

“It is a very difficult time. While the sun is shining in Las Vegas, it is a very dark and black day,” she said.

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