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Turner Gives Some Details On Plan To Consider Removal Of Confederate Monuments

The Mayor will seek input from experts at local universities, such as the University of Houston, Texas Southern University and Rice University.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the process to decide about the removal of Confederate statues and monuments from public property that the City has just started will be “thoughtful.”
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the process to decide about the removal of Confederate statues and monuments from public property that the City has just started will be “thoughtful.”

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is elaborating on his plan to consider the removal of Confederate monuments located on public property.

During the customary press conference held after the City Council’s Wednesday meeting, Turner noted he is reacting to renewed demand from some Houstonians after the tragic rally held in Charlottesville.

The Mayor made clear the process to decide about the removal will be “thoughtful,” but he also gave his share of advice to Houstonians.

“I think it’s also very important that we not allow the national discourse, and what’s being said and how things are being handled on the national level, to flow down into the city of Houston and pull us apart,” Turner said.

As of now, the Mayor only knows of two Confederate monuments on public property, which are ‘The Spirit of the Confederacy’, located in the Sam Houston Park, and the statue of Dick Dowling, located in one of the access points to Hermann Park.

In addition to the information he receives from his staff about the Confederate statues and monuments that are located in property belonging to the City, the Mayor added he wants to also seek input from experts at local universities, such as the University of Houston, Texas Southern University and Rice University.

“If there’s a significant population in Houston that feels offended and feels that statue reinforces a racist point of view, I think that statue should be brought down. Statues are not put in place to impose a point of view on people,” noted in that regard historian Jeremi Suri, with the University of Texas at Austin, speaking on Houston Matters.

The City says the first step in the process will be an inventory of Confederate monuments.

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Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz

General Assignment Reporter

Alvaro 'Al' Ortiz is originally from Spain. He worked for several years in his home country and gained experience in all platforms of journalism, from wire services to print, as well as broadcast news and digital reporting. In 2001, Al came to the United States to pursue a Master's degree...

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