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Hundreds Of Houston Police Officers Have Handguns That Could Malfunction

Tests done by HPD found the Sig Sauer P-320 model can accidentally fire if it is dropped.

Tests conducted last week by the Houston Police Department found the Sig Sauer P-320 model can accidentally fire if it is dropped.
Tests conducted last week by the Houston Police Department found the Sig Sauer P-320 model can accidentally fire if it is dropped.

Hundreds of Houston police officers are using handguns that could malfunction.

The guns are the P-320 model made by the company Sig Sauer.

After learning about a potential malfunction reported on social media, the Houston Police Department (HPD) tested the firearm last week, according to Captain Gregory Fremin, who is in charge of training at the Department’s academy.

According to HPD’s tests, the gun accidentally fired more than 10 percent of the times when it was dropped:

“We dropped the weapon 30 times and, out of the 30 times, it discharged four times. So, we can’t have a discharging at all like that. That is a severe safety issue for all of our officers out on the street,” Fremin tells Houston Public Media.

Fremin adds the company will replace HPD’s guns. “We are still inventorying, but our numbers are going to be between 700 and 800 officers. And that’s active duty officers, but there’s still a number of retired officers that have that weaponry too.”

A press release from Sig Sauer says the company has developed “enhancements” of the P-320, including how the gun performs if it is dropped.

Ray Hunt, president of the Houston Police Officers’ Union, says he feels relieved because “if an officer is struggling with someone and somehow his gun gets knocked out of his hand and falls down, it could strike the officer, it could strike the suspect or it could strike an innocent bystander.”

The Harris County Sheriff’s Office also uses the P-320 and has already informed its deputies about the malfunction.

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Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz

Digital News Producer

Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz is originally from Madrid (Spain). He worked for several years in his home country and gained experience in all platforms of journalism, from wire services to print, as well as broadcast and digital reporting. In 2001, Al came to the United States to pursue a Master’s degree...

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