City of Houston

Houston City Council Approves $5.2 Billion Budget For Fiscal Year 2018

Mayor Turner describes it as conservative and underscores it fully funds pension costs.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner describes the City’s budget for Fiscal Year 2018 as conservative and underscores it fully funds the pension costs.
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner describes the City’s budget for Fiscal Year 2018 as conservative and underscores it fully funds the pension costs.

The Houston City Council passed Wednesday the budget for Fiscal Year 2018, which will start next July 1st and will end on June 30th 2018.

The Council approved the 5.2 billion dollar budget unanimously.

Some of the winners include the Houston Police Department (HPD), the Department of Public Works and Engineering and the Houston Airport System, which will get more money compared to Fiscal Year 2017.

Mayor Sylvester Turner described the budget as conservative.

“The reserve, which is supposed to be at seven point five percent, is at eight point nine percent, which is good and I think the credit rating agencies will view that very favorably,” the Mayor emphasized during the press conference held after the Council meeting.

He also underscored that the City is “fully funding for the first time our pension cost.”

Additionally, the budget closes a 130 million dollar shortfall.

There is also one million dollars of funding for each of the 11 districts represented in the City Council to be used for specific projects, such as, for example, installing speed bump and repairing curbsides.

Council Member Greg Travis, who represents District G, pushed for those funds through an amendment he had filed and argued it will have a minimal impact on the City’s finances.

“We are talking about point 0, 0, 0, 0, four, four percent of a budget. In the overall scheme of things it’s nothing, but to each of our districts, it’s everything,” Travis noted when the Council was debating his amendment.

Nonetheless, Mayor Turner says he is concerned the Council Members who supported and passed Travis’ amendment with their votes didn’t identify a specific source to pay for the projects in the districts.

 

Share