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Top Workplaces in Houston, and Shutting Down Notorious Apartments: Tuesday’s Show (May 23, 2017)

Every year, the Houston Chronicle puts together a list of the best workplaces in Houston, based on employee surveys distributed through a third-party company. The 2017 results won’t come until the fall, but, until then, what does make for a good workplace according to Houstonians? Is it the hours, the work space, the benefits, the […]

Photo: Michael Hagerty, Houston Public Media

Every year, the Houston Chronicle puts together a list of the best workplaces in Houston, based on employee surveys distributed through a third-party company. The 2017 results won’t come until the fall, but, until then, what does make for a good workplace according to Houstonians?

Is it the hours, the work space, the benefits, the personnel? We talk with Chronicle business reporter Al Lewis about putting together this annual piece and discuss the kinds of things employees seem to like in Greater Houston.

Also this hour…

Lessons Learned from a Shuttered Apartment Complex

The Crestmont Village Apartments in southeast Houston were recently demolished. A judge shut down the complex in late 2015 after residents complained of several ailments, including leaky roofs, rodents, raw sewage coming up from the ground, and other unsafe living conditions. Mayor Sylvester Turner was at the demolition to, as he said, “put slumlords on notice.”

But how did a modern-day Houston residential community get to this point? And how can something similar be prevented from happening again? We talk with City Council Member Dwight Boykins, who represents the area where Crestmont was located, and Tom McCasland, director of the Houston Housing and Community Development Department.

Ask the Dentist

From tooth aches to cavities and dental dams, we get answers to your dental questions from Dr. Ryan Quock from the UTHealth School of Dentistry.

How the Great Migration Changed Houston

Students from the University of Houston and Texas Southern University recently collaborated to produce an exhibit on the Great Migration — the historical mass migration of African Americans out of the South to northern and western cities during the 20th century.

Irene Guenther teaches history at UH, and her students contributed projects to the exhibit. She tells Maggie Martin how the movement changed Greater Houston. The exhibit will be on display through the summer at the Houston Heritage Society.

Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.

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