Texas Legislature

Texas Becomes 11th State To Call for New U.S. Constitutional Convention

The Article V of the U.S. Constitution requires two-thirds of the states to call for such a convention for one to take place – 34 out of the current 50.

The Texas House has approved a resolution calling for a new U.S. constitutional convention. The aim of the convention would be to propose a series of amendments to limit federal power and spending, as well as to impose term limits on members of Congress.

Special Coverage Of The 85th Texas Legislative Session

Special Coverage Of The 85th Texas Legislative Session

Debate over the measure was sharp and partisan, but brief. In one exchange, State Rep. Roland Gutierrez (D-San Antonio) challenged one of the bill’s leading advocates, State Rep. Rick Miller (R-Sugar Land), regarding the House’s recent passage of the “Sanctuary Cities” bill.

“What do you tell all those good folks about the unfunded mandate that we did last week?” Gutierrez asked.

“We’re here to discuss this resolution. Okay?” Miller said.

“But that’s my point, Representative Miller,” Gutierrez said. “We’re here talking about your so-called federal overreach. And yet your own party just last week suggested to all of us that we want to have more federal government in our backyard. We want to abrogate local control.”

The resolution is now the second of Governor Greg Abbott’s four emergency items for the legislative session to make it across the finish line, following the Sanctuary Cities legislation. Child Protective Services reform and ethics reform remain several steps from completion.

Article V of the U.S. Constitution requires two-thirds of the states to call for such a convention for one to take place – 34 out of the current 50. Passage of this resolution makes Texas number 11.

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Andrew Schneider

Andrew Schneider

Politics and Government Reporter

Andrew heads Houston Public Media’s coverage of national, state, and local elections. He also reports on major policy issues before the Texas delegations in the U.S. House and Senate, as well as the Texas governorship, the state legislature, and county and city governments. Before taking up his current post, Andrew...

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