Transportation

Brazoria County Hopes Flood Cleanup Is Almost Finished

Trucks will make one last pass through Brazoria County this week to pick up storm debris. Many people are still recovering after historic flooding on the Brazos River.

Brazoria County officials are asking residents to separate their storm debris.
Brazoria County officials are asking residents to separate their storm debris.

Trucks will make one last pass through Brazoria County this week to pick up storm debris. Many people are still recovering after historic flooding on the Brazos River.

Assistant Brazoria County Engineer Trey Haskins estimates about 400 square miles of the county was affected by flooding on the Brazos River. The amount of debris left behind was immense.

“So just imagine a football field about 12 feet deep of just house debris, furniture and appliances and things of that nature,” says Haskins.

The water didn’t totally recede until the middle of June and people have been cleaning up ever since. And for some people it’s taking awhile because of insurance claims.

Brazoria County brought in a couple of private companies to help with debris pickup and Haskins says they’ll make their final rounds this week.

“The haulers will begin a slower process this time, making sure that they get as much as possible because we need to be one and done with this,” adds Haskins. “We think we’ve gotten the majority of it.”   

Haskins says they’ll be picking up debris in the unincorporated areas and residents will have to leave their trash on the side of a public street. Trash haulers won’t be able to go down private driveways.

As for how much it’s costing to get rid of all that debris, Haskins says they’ve spent about $450,000. They’re hoping most of that money will be reimbursed by FEMA.

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Gail Delaughter

Transportation Reporter

From early-morning interviews with commuters to walks through muddy construction sites, Gail covers all aspects of getting around Houston. That includes walking, driving, cycling, taking the bus, and occasionally flying. Before she became transportation reporter in 2011, Gail hosted weekend programs for Houston Public Media. She's also covered courts in...

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