Education News

Where Are The Latina School Superintendents In Texas?

As the population of Texas grows more diverse, some education leaders want to see that change better reflected in the leadership of schools.

Marla Guerra is one of the few Latina superintendents in the state. She heads up the South Texas Independent School District – a position she’s held for fifteen years.

“The superintendency is still very much a man’s world and the majority of superintendents in the state are male,” Guerra says. “I don’t understand why except that usually school board members that hire superintendents are still predominately mostly men. However, I see a great increase in the number of women that are running for school board.”

Frank Hernandez is the Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial Chair in Education Policy and Leadership and Associate Dean of the Simmons School of Education & Human Development at SMU.
Frank Hernandez is the Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial Chair in Education Policy and Leadership and Associate Dean of the Simmons School of Education & Human Development at SMU.

There are sixteen Latinas serving as superintendents or interim leaders in the state, according to the Texas Association of School Administrators.

Frank Hernandez is with the Simmons School of Education and Human Development at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. He studies Latinos and school leadership.

While he’s encouraged by the growing number of Hispanic men in education leadership roles, he says a lot more work remains to get more women in those positions.

“What we have found in our research is that, historically, Latinas spend more time in the classroom, more time as school administrators, like principals,” Hernandez says. “And really have historically needed more support and encouragement to take on leadership positions that really have historically been for men.”

One way to address this, Hernandez says, is through mentoring and academies where educators get training for the superintendent role.

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