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Houston’s Scrap Tire Ordinance Means Businesses Will Have To Register With The City

The grace period ends this week.

City officials say scrap tire illegal operations and dumping them are a problem because they become breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
City officials say scrap tire illegal operations and dumping them are a problem because they become breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

Houston is ramping up efforts against illegal used tires operations and Mayor Sylvester Turner says that will help the city with a public health battle.

The grace period for the scrap tire ordinance, which the Houston City Council passed in 2015, ends this week.

All used tires operators will have to register with the city and get permits.

Mayor Turner says one reason these illegal operations are a problem is they become breeding grounds for mosquitoes that can carry diseases, like the Zika and West Nile viruses.

“The reality is just since we started the clean-up program in our battle against Zika we have picked up more than 19,000 tires, so there are a lot of people who are abusing the process,” Turner said at a press conference after the city council’s weekly meeting.

The registration will cost $93 dollars for businesses that store and sell used tires and companies that transport the tires will have to pay $172 dollars.

Those that don’t comply can be fined $250 dollars, per day, per offense.

The Houston Police Department will also play a role.

“We are gonna be attacking it, as far as an enforcement perspective, from several different ways. Obviously, the patrol officers on the street will have some training on what the permits look like,” noted interim Chief Martha Montalvo.

City officials say Houstonians can help reduce the amount of used tires by buying retreaded units.

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Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz

Digital News Producer

Alvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz is originally from Madrid (Spain). He worked for several years in his home country and gained experience in all platforms of journalism, from wire services to print, as well as broadcast and digital reporting. In 2001, Al came to the United States to pursue a Master’s degree...

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