Transportation

Metro Wants To Ease Rail Security Concerns After Northside Murder

Neighborhood remains on edge as police continue looking for the person who killed an 11-year-old boy.

North Main Street rail platform at Quitman Street
Riders prepare to board on North Main Street at Quitman.

At last month's Metro board meeting member Christof Spieler talked about the Quitman rail platform on North Main Street. He said it was the only place he felt unsafe waiting for the train after dark.

The platform is only blocks away from where 11-year-old Josue Flores was killed as he walked home from school. Police are still looking for a suspect.

A memorial for 11-year-old Josue Flores on Fulton Street, about five blocks from the light rail line.
A memorial for 11-year-old Josue Flores on Fulton Street, about five blocks from the light rail line.

Metro CEO Tom Lambert maintains the rail line is safe. He says about 65,000 people a day ride the train but there are only about 25 incidents every month. To alleviate concerns in the neighborhood, Lambert says Metro police are beefing up their presence.

"We now have an officer assigned from 6:00 a.m. in the morning until 11:00 o'clock at night at the Quitman rail platform," says Lambert. "That's the platform right across from the Salvation Army. And I know there's been a lot of discussion about how the Salvation Army can help improve the conditions there."

And Metro Chairman Carrin Patman says the agency needs more outreach to the homeless and mentally ill.

"We want to do what we can to provide transit to them to the facilities and services they need, as well as participate with any community endeavors that exist out there to help that population," adds Patman.

Along with an increased police presence on the Quitman platform, Metro says its officers will also patrol the neighborhood during the overnight hours.

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Gail Delaughter

Gail Delaughter

Transportation Reporter

From early-morning interviews with commuters to walks through muddy construction sites, Gail covers all aspects of getting around Houston. That includes walking, driving, cycling, taking the bus, and occasionally flying. Before she became transportation reporter in 2011, Gail hosted weekend programs for Houston Public Media. She's also covered courts in...

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