Full Show

Judges and Party Affiliation: Friday’s Show (March 25, 2016)

Across the country, you’ll find different systems in place for naming and retaining judges. In some states, judges are named by the executive branch and approved or rejected by the legislature. In others, judges are named and then face “retention elections” at regular intervals when voters can choose to retain or dismiss the judge. Here […]

Across the country, you’ll find different systems in place for naming and retaining judges. In some states, judges are named by the executive branch and approved or rejected by the legislature. In others, judges are named and then face “retention elections” at regular intervals when voters can choose to retain or dismiss the judge. Here in Texas, we have full-fledged elections for fixed terms for both state and appellate judges, and candidates for judge must declare a party affiliation. Some would like to see that changed.

On this edition of Houston Matters, we discuss the history of judicial elections in Texas, and consider whether Texas judges should continue to be associated with political parties.

We welcome your questions and comments for David Furlow, executive editor of The Texas Supreme Court Historical Society Journal, and Richard Murray, political science professor from the University of Houston.

Also this hour: We talk with David Kim, the new executive director of Houston’s Urban Land Institute office. ULI is a nonprofit research and education organization focused on responsible land use and developing sustainable communities. We discuss what  may be some of the challenges and opportunities Houston faces in becoming a more sustainable city.

Then: A lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to our rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of it all. This week our panel (attorney and community education advocate Monica Richart, University of St. Thomas College Republican Chair Vlad Davidiuk, and MochaDad.com blogger Fred Goodall) examines the state of Houston’s airports, more indictments in connection with last May’s shootout outside a Waco Twin Peaks restaurant and a new Houston-based reality show featuring prominent area black female attorneys.

Plus: Since 2008, The Telling Project has used theater to allow veterans and their families to tell their stories, deepen the public’s understanding of the military veteran experience and foster an easier transition back to civilian life. Edel Howlin reports on a new Telling Project production at the Alley Theatre.

Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.

Share