Health & Science

US Supreme Court Blocks Louisiana Abortion Clinic Law Similar To Texas

The law requires doctors who provide abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Front photo of the Supreme Court building
Supreme Court building, Washington, DC, USA. Front facade.

The United States Supreme Court Friday blocked enforcement of a Louisiana law that could force all but one of the state’s abortion clinics to close, a sign that a similar law in Texas also could be in peril.

The justices are effectively reversing an order by the federal Appeals Court in New Orleans that allowed Louisiana to begin enforcing its 2014 clinic regulation law, even as it is being challenged in the courts.

The law requires doctors who provide abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

The legal group representing the clinics says facilities in Baton Rouge and Bossier City already have had to stop providing abortions and a clinic in Shreveport would have to stop providing abortions soon.

Two dozen states have passed regulations similar to those in Texas.

When Texas passed one of the toughest laws in the country regarding abortion services in 2013, the number of clinics offering the procedure dropped from 41 to 19. Another 10 were set to close before the justices blocked further implementation of the law in June 2015.

The Supreme Court held a hearing on Wednesday on the Texas law.

Many Texas lawmakers have said repeatedly that making abortion safer for women was exactly why they passed the law that requires clinics to meet the same standards as outpatient surgery centers, among other strict new medical regulations.

Pro-choice advocates argue that the regulations are onerous and are an attempt to ban abortion in the state.

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