Houston Matters

Crime and Promise in Houston’s Sunnyside Neighborhood

Google searches can tell you a lot about how a community is perceived. Do a search of “EaDo Houston,” and you’ll find a Wikipedia page, someone’s post of the top ten restaurants east of downtown, an article about how the EaDo neighborhood represents the “Changing Face of Houston.” Okay, now do a search of “Sunnyside […]

Google searches can tell you a lot about how a community is perceived. Do a search of “EaDo Houston,” and you’ll find a Wikipedia page, someone’s post of the top ten restaurants east of downtown, an article about how the EaDo neighborhood represents the “Changing Face of Houston.”

Okay, now do a search of “Sunnyside Houston” – and there’s no Wikipedia page topping the results, no article about restaurants or culture surrounding the southeast Houston neighborhood. No, it’s just a litany of crimes. A police standoff, an elderly woman attacked in her home, a Superintendent resigning after a DUI arrest. Life, it would seem, is not so sweet on the sunny side of the street.

But Houston City Council Member Dwight Boykins might quibble with that perception. Sure, the bad news these days may outweigh the good, but Boykins (who represents the Third Ward, Alameda, and Sunnyside in District D) says you can find evidence of both in Sunnyside, a community he tells Houston Matters producer Paige Phelps is sometimes overshadowed by its Third Ward neighbor.

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