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Houston City Council Designates Seven Properties As Historic Landmarks

The historic properties range from a high-rise building downtown, an elaborate River Oaks mansion, to a one-story residence in the Montrose neighborhood.

  • The Gulf Oil Filing Station at 3709 La Branch Street was constructed in 1926 for the Gulf Oil Corporation. According to the City of Houston, this structure is one of only a handful of remaining examples of early small-scale neighborhood filling stations.  Since 2010, the Station Museum of Contemporary Art, located across the street at 1502 Alabama Street, has used the Gulf Filling Station as both an outdoor gallery and art canvas in exhibitions.  (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Gulf Oil Filing Station at 3709 La Branch Street was constructed in 1926 for the Gulf Oil Corporation. According to the City of Houston, this structure is one of only a handful of remaining examples of early small-scale neighborhood filling stations. Since 2010, the Station Museum of Contemporary Art, located across the street at 1502 Alabama Street, has used the Gulf Filling Station as both an outdoor gallery and art canvas in exhibitions. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Houston Heights Water Works is located at 449 West 19th Street. The Houston Heights Water Works site contains three remaining historic structures: a 1928 brick-clad concrete 750,000 gallon Water Reservoir with an unusual grass roof, which is listed in the National Register of Historical Places; an Art Deco-style Pumping Building built by the federal Work Project Administration in 1939; and a limestone-trimmed brick-clad Pumping Building built in 1949 in a modern industrial style.  (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Houston Heights Water Works is located at 449 West 19th Street. The Houston Heights Water Works site contains three remaining historic structures: a 1928 brick-clad concrete 750,000 gallon Water Reservoir with an unusual grass roof, which is listed in the National Register of Historical Places; an Art Deco-style Pumping Building built by the federal Work Project Administration in 1939; and a limestone-trimmed brick-clad Pumping Building built in 1949 in a modern industrial style. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Judge and Mrs. J.A. Platt House at 3311 Del Monte Drive in River Oaks Country Club Estates was constructed in 1936 by contractor E.T. Seymour of Beaumont from a design by celebrated architect Joseph Finger. He designed the elaborately detailed, 7,347-square-foot, two-story painted brick house in the French Renaissance style.  (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Judge and Mrs. J.A. Platt House at 3311 Del Monte Drive in River Oaks Country Club Estates was constructed in 1936 by contractor E.T. Seymour of Beaumont from a design by celebrated architect Joseph Finger. He designed the elaborately detailed, 7,347-square-foot, two-story painted brick house in the French Renaissance style. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Judge Joseph R. Greenhill III and Violet Stanuell Greenhill House at 2520 Mason Street in the Montrose neighborhood was the childhood home of Judge Joe R. Greenhill III, the longest-serving chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court, and his mother Violet Stanuell Greenhill, who was the first chief executive of the Texas Division of Child Welfare. 
 (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Judge Joseph R. Greenhill III and Violet Stanuell Greenhill House at 2520 Mason Street in the Montrose neighborhood was the childhood home of Judge Joe R. Greenhill III, the longest-serving chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court, and his mother Violet Stanuell Greenhill, who was the first chief executive of the Texas Division of Child Welfare. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Melrose Building at 1121 Walker Street is a twenty-one story office tower located in downtown Houston. Houston architects Hermon Lloyd and W.B. Morgan to design the office building. The two developers named the building the Melrose Building from the combination of both of their names. The building is Houston’s first International Style skyscraper and the first to incorporate cast concrete cantilevered sunshades shielding rows of grouped windows.  (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Melrose Building at 1121 Walker Street is a twenty-one story office tower located in downtown Houston. Houston architects Hermon Lloyd and W.B. Morgan to design the office building. The two developers named the building the Melrose Building from the combination of both of their names. The building is Houston’s first International Style skyscraper and the first to incorporate cast concrete cantilevered sunshades shielding rows of grouped windows. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Mr. and Mrs. S.I. Morris House is a contemporary residence at 2 Waverly Court in the Museum District south of downtown Houston. The house was designed by prominent Houston architect Seth Irwin “S.I.” Morris, Jr. and completed in 1952 as his family’s home.  (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Mr. and Mrs. S.I. Morris House is a contemporary residence at 2 Waverly Court in the Museum District south of downtown Houston. The house was designed by prominent Houston architect Seth Irwin “S.I.” Morris, Jr. and completed in 1952 as his family’s home. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
  • The Stowers Building at 820 Fannin Street is an early high-rise construction. It is comprised of traditional classical and Chicago style influences. Designed by the Houston architectural firm Green & Finger and completed in 1913. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)
    The Stowers Building at 820 Fannin Street is an early high-rise construction. It is comprised of traditional classical and Chicago style influences. Designed by the Houston architectural firm Green & Finger and completed in 1913. (Photo Credit: Photos courtesy of City of Houston Planning & Development Department)

 

The Houston City Council designated seven properties as historic landmarks Wednesday.

The properties are the Gulf Oil Filing Station, the Melrose Building, the Stowers Building, the Judge and Mrs. J.A. Platt House and the Judge Joseph R. Greenhill III and Violet Stanuell Greenhill House, the Houston Heights Water Works and the Mr. and Mrs. S.I. Morris House.

Check out the slideshow above, and click on the ‘i’ in the photos, to view more information about each location.

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