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The Life and Times of George H.W. Bush: Thursday’s Show (November 12, 2015)

In the development of his new biography Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush, author Jon Meacham conducted extensive interviews over a decade with the 41st President, his family, friends and colleagues, and was granted access to the former president’s audio diaries and First Lady Barbara Bush’s diary. The book, just out this week, […]

In the development of his new biography Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush, author Jon Meacham conducted extensive interviews over a decade with the 41st President, his family, friends and colleagues, and was granted access to the former president’s audio diaries and First Lady Barbara Bush’s diary. The book, just out this week, has gained headlines for revelations from the elder Bush about his willingness to risk impeachment, if necessary, to engage in the first Gulf War, as well as some critiques of his son’s presidency.

We discuss all of that but also learn about moments that underscore Houston’s influence on the man and his life as we talk with Meacham on this edition of Houston Matters.

Also this hour: When Sheletta Brundidge, who bills herself as the funniest mom in Houston, found out her husband had lost his job — just after her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder — she stopped laughing. Her son’s medical insurance was going to run out, and thousands of dollars in much-needed therapy loomed. So Brundidge transformed herself into what she calls a “warrior mom.” She found the money for her kid’s medical needs and she’s been so successful at it she’s decided to teach seminars for other families with special-needs kids. We talk with her about becoming a grant expert and what she hopes to impart to others.

Plus: Trey Edward Shults was born and raised in Spring, and from the very beginning he seemed to have incredible luck. He began his filmmaking career interning on Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life and working in the camera department for Malick’s Voyage of Time. But his biggest success – so far, at least – is his first professional film, Krisha, which was shot in his mother’s home over nine days for less than $15,000. It premiered at SXSW in 2014 and received Special Jury Recognition for Cinematography. Paige Phelps talks with Shults about the film, which screens Saturday (Nov. 14, 2015) at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival.

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