This article is over 7 years old

Visual Art

Abandoned House In Sharpstown Reimagined As Art Exhibit

An art installation in Houston’s Sharpstown neighborhood is getting attention from the community. An artist has turned an abandoned home into a time capsule.

Listen

To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:

<iframe src="https://embed.hpm.io/125387/125380" style="height: 115px; width: 100%;"></iframe>
X
  • Squier chose to leave the kitchen exactly as they found it and turned the space into a diorama.
    Squier chose to leave the kitchen exactly as they found it and turned the space into a diorama.
  • An assortment of lamps salvaged from the home
    An assortment of lamps salvaged from the home
  • The backyard held dozens of cinder blocks used as planters, flower beds, and a patio area. Squier used them to created a wall-sized sculpture.
    The backyard held dozens of cinder blocks used as planters, flower beds, and a patio area. Squier used them to created a wall-sized sculpture.
  • Snowglobes and other kitsch are among the items resurrected from the clutter.
    Snowglobes and other kitsch are among the items resurrected from the clutter.

Following the announcement of an art opening in Sharpstown, some people may be thinking, "Sharpstown? Really?"

"That's exactly the reaction I want," says Michael Prentice, founder of Seeds of Sharpstown, the organization responsible for the project. "That's exactly what makes people say, ‘Hey, I actually will come to the opening.'"

Prentice commissioned artist Alexander Squier to turn an abandoned mid-century house into an exhibit. And it wasn't an easy job.

"It was decrepit, it was disgusting," Squier says, adding that the place had about four feet of junk that had accumulated. It was so infested with fleas that he had to wear a HAZMAT suit during the first couple of days he spent going through the clutter.

Many of the objects found within the home became part of the installation, but Squire chose to leave the kitchen completely untouched. The sink is overflowing with stacks of dirty dishes. The refrigerator door is open, exposing its grimy yellowed interior.

The house had been abandoned for a couple of years after the previous owner died and his belongings were left behind. In a way, the transformation represents a community experiencing a rebirth.

"There are a lot of people in Greater Houston that think that this area is not to be even visited because of its bad reputation," Prentice says.

By designating an exhibit space and endorsing local art, he hopes that sentiment will change.

Remnants of the past... Visions of the Future is on display through January 3rd at 7831 Fondren Rd.

Today in Houston Newsletter Signup
We're in the process of transitioning services for our Today in Houston newsletter. If you'd like to sign up now, fill out the form below and we will add you as soon as we finish the transition. **Please note** If you are already signed up for the newsletter, you do not need to sign up again. Your subscription will be migrated over.