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Living in the Community You Serve: Friday’s Show (October 16, 2015)

Recently, the Houston City Council contemplated whether to pay police officers more money to live in the city and closer to the communities they serve. Council members shelved the topic after struggling to find common ground. It’s not a new concept, and not unique to law enforcement. Some propose it’s beneficial for educators to live where […]

Recently, the Houston City Council contemplated whether to pay police officers more money to live in the city and closer to the communities they serve. Council members shelved the topic after struggling to find common ground. It’s not a new concept, and not unique to law enforcement. Some propose it’s beneficial for educators to live where they work as well.

We discuss the pros and cons of living in the community you serve on this edition of Houston Matters, as we talk with UH criminologist Everette Penn, sociologist Luis Salinas, and Andy Dewey from the Houston Federation of Teachers.

Also this hour: The Urban Land Institute, after calling Houston the No. 1 real estate market to watch last year, says we’re No. 30 this year. That represents the biggest drop for any city on ULI’s list. What happened? Why are we no longer a market to watch? We talk it over, and what — if anything — the shift might suggest about Houston’s real estate future, with Bill Fulton, Director of Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

Then: A lot can happen in a week — some of it good, some of it bad, some of it ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the news that we just don’t know what to make of, we turn to our rotating panel of “non-experts” to contemplate The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of it all. Today, we’re joined by three political and legal minds: Tamara Tabo, Charles Kuffner, and Mary Flood. We discuss a February 2016 GOP Presidential debate planned at the University of Houston, an inadvertent and ill-timed tweet from Gov. Abbott’s Twitter account, and whether Houston has truly become one of the “buggiest” cities in the country.

Plus: A dance performance at White Oak Bayou downtown incorporates music from a local composer. We learn about the dancing…and the music.

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