Transportation

Police Are Out Looking For Drunk Drivers This Labor Day Weekend

TxDOT is appealing to people to get a sober ride home if they’d had too much to drink.

photo of a vehicle being pulled over
Texas DPS Highway Patrol
The last big holiday weekend of summer can be a dangerous time on Texas highways. TxDOT is appealing to people to get a sober ride home if they’d had too much to drink.

Officials with the transportation agency report that last Labor Day weekend, there were 338 drunk driving wrecks on Texas highways. Twenty-one people were killed. Forty-two others were seriously hurt.

TxDOT’s Deidrea George says all those crashes were preventable.

“If you’re not designating a sober driver, then you do not need to drive at all,” says George. “You can call a taxi; you can use soberrides.org. There are so many things that you can do, instead of get behind the wheel if you’ve been drinking.”

And even if there isn’t a crash, a DWI conviction is something that won’t go away anytime soon.

George says it can wind up costing up to $17,000.

“If you are working a job, you may lose that job because of the time you’re going to be spending in court and paying all these fees,” says George. “And you don’t have a job and are looking for a job, that certainly is something that you don’t want your future employers to know.”

Many communities around Texas are ramping up patrols, specifically looking for intoxicated drivers.

They’re also having No Refusal” weekends — that’s where law enforcement officers are authorized to take blood samples from suspected drunk drivers.

Subscribe to Today in Houston

Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.

* required

Share

Gail Delaughter

Gail Delaughter

Transportation Reporter

From early-morning interviews with commuters to walks through muddy construction sites, Gail covers all aspects of getting around Houston. That includes walking, driving, cycling, taking the bus, and occasionally flying. Before she became transportation reporter in 2011, Gail hosted weekend programs for Houston Public Media. She's also covered courts in...

More Information