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Marty McVey Mayoral Candidate Interview: Tuesday’s Show (August 25, 2015)

On Tuesdays through Sept. 22, 2015, on Houston Matters we’re offering you a chance to speak directly with the major candidates running to be the next mayor of the city of Houston. We continue on this edition with Houston area businessman Marty McVey.  In 2011, the private equity investor was appointed by the Obama administration to serve […]

Mayoral Candidates 2015 BannerOn Tuesdays through Sept. 22, 2015, on Houston Matters we’re offering you a chance to speak directly with the major candidates running to be the next mayor of the city of Houston. We continue on this edition with Houston area businessman Marty McVey.  In 2011, the private equity investor was appointed by the Obama administration to serve on an advisory board for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). McVey is also a licensed real estate broker. He has never held elective office.

We discuss some of the issues facing Houston and what he thinks he would bring to the office. But really, this is a chance for you to ask your questions of this candidate. We field your questions.

Also this hour: Houston Police Department forensic artist Lois Gibson has been drawing criminals’ faces for 33 years. In 2004, the Guinness Book of World Records recognized her work as the record holder for “most criminals positively identified due to the composites of one artist.” She admits other forensic artists probably have a higher record, but she’s the only who has documented every sketch that has led to an arrest. Gibson tells Houston Matters’ Edel Howlin about her work.

Plus: Throughout the summer months, Houston Matters is dedicating time each week to books about Greater Houston, set in Greater Houston or written or edited by Houstonians. Our summer reading series continues today with Houston native Scott Wilbanks. He tells Michael Hagerty about his debut novel, The Lemoncholy Life of Annie AsterThe novel employs  magical realism to tell the story of two women writing letters to each other over space and time – 100 years apart. Wilbanks shares how the idea for the story stemmed from a botched first date.

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