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Houston Under the Radar: Friday’s show (March 27, 2015)

Houston’s received a lot of positive press in recent years, for being the most diverse city in the nation, for our abundant and growing food and arts scenes, for our economic success, for being the city today that the rest of America may look like in the future. We still may not be used to […]

Houston’s received a lot of positive press in recent years, for being the most diverse city in the nation, for our abundant and growing food and arts scenes, for our economic success, for being the city today that the rest of America may look like in the future.

We still may not be used to all the attention, and feel overlooked, at times, in national media. But there’s something to be said for flying just under the radar. For example: is anyone really upset that Greater Houston was, if anything, an afterthought in coverage of the most recent developments of the Robert Durst saga? Or that while much of the nation was socked in by blizzard conditions this winter, our northern neighbors never really noticed us carrying on blissfully above freezing?

How do we handle the attention we do get? And when are we better off simply flying under the rest of the nation’s radar? Do you want America to pay more attention to us, for both our successes and our shortcomings? Or are we better off keeping mum about all that’s great (and occasionally not-so-great) in Greater Houston?

We’ll contemplate these questions on this edition of Houston Matters, with Craig Hlavaty, a reporter who’s written on this very issue for the Houston Chronicle Media Group; James Glassman, the founder and director of Houstorian, a preservation group; and Mike McGuff, Houston media blogger.

Also this hour: from Ted Cruz’s presidential bid, to Schlumberger’s record criminal fine, to yet another plan for the Astrodome, we consider The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of this week’s news, with our rotating panel of “non-experts.” Today: Houston Chronicle columnist Lisa Falkenberg, parenting blogger Fred Goodall, and University of St. Thomas College Republicans Chairman Vlad Davidiuk.

Plus: Maggie Martin talks with Rice University English Professor Timothy Morton about his collaboration with Icelandic singer and artist Bjork. This Huge Sunlit Abyss From The Future Right There Next To You is Morton’s volume within a new book called Bjork: Archives.

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