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Child Fatality Report and Competitive Cooking: Wednesday’s Show (March 25, 2015)

Two state agencies have collaborated to create a report examining child abuse and neglect fatalities in Texas. Researchers with the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services used public health information from the Department of State Health Services to examine nearly 700 cases in which a child died from abuse or neglect from 2010 to […]

Two state agencies have collaborated to create a report examining child abuse and neglect fatalities in Texas. Researchers with the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services used public health information from the Department of State Health Services to examine nearly 700 cases in which a child died from abuse or neglect from 2010 to 2012. The data was used to formulate a strategic plan to target communities with high numbers of these fatalities.

On this edition of Houston Matters, producer Maggie Martin talks with Sasha Rasco, the Director of Prevention and Early Intervention at DFPS about the report and the plan to address its findings.

Then: As the Texas Legislature takes on open carry and campus carry bills, psychologist Michael Winters joins us to contemplate what goes on in our minds when we enter a room, and we know someone there has a gun — and why some among us feel safer, while others feel threatened. We also discuss what’s happening psychologically when we’re the ones carrying the weapon.

Also this hour: We talk with Dr. Nan Astone from the DC-based public policy think tank The Urban Institute, about the organization’s report indicating death among white women in the United States is on the rise. It’s a trend also reflected, though at a lower rate, in Harris and Galveston counties. We find out why Dr. Astone thinks this might be happening to this particular demographic subset.

And: Cooking competitions seem to be all the rage these days. From Food Network shows like Chopped and the long-running series Iron Chef, to reality series like Top Chef, Hell’s Kitchen and MasterChef, millions enjoy watching chefs of varying skills try to prepare pleasingly edible dishes under time constraints using odd ingredients. But it’s not just made-for-TV. Similar competitions have sprung up across the country, including here in Houston. We learn more from Eric Sandler, who covers the bar and restaurant scene for CultureMap Houston.

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