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Judge Grants Freedmen’s Town A Temporary Injunction

Historic bricks that line a 4th Ward neighborhood are now protected by a temporary injunction. The ruling paves the way for repairs to water and sewer lines.

section of bricks removed
Crews halted construction after removing a section of bricks on Wilson Street. They were forced to stop after a judge issued a temporary restraining order against them back in January.

 

Historic bricks that line a 4th Ward neighborhood are now protected by a temporary injunction. The ruling paves the way for repairs to water and sewer lines.

Bricks that pave Andrews and Wilson streets in 4th Ward were laid by descendants of freed slaves more than 100 years ago. The city says aging water and sewage pipes that lie underneath the bricks need to be replaced.

“This is all that the Coalition members and the plaintiffs asked for, and more,” says Ben Hall.

Ben Hall, attorney for the Freedmen’s Town Preservation Coalition, says the injunction will give the two sides time to agree on a repair plan.

“Get the utility lines in, the water lines in, because the residents deserve better utilities. And we can now move our attention to that issue, as opposed get distracted by protecting history,” Hall says.

The city approved a $5 million contract for Conrad Construction to do the work.

“The temporary injunction is going to be in place until we have a trial on the merits. Look this is a very simple case. If you think that you have permits that are required by law,” Hall says. “The fact of the matter is they don’t have a permit; and therefore, they’re not in compliance with the law.”

Hall says he hopes the city proceeds with the repairs while it preserves their bricks’ contribution to Houston history.

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